Posted tagged ‘Smartphone’

Google Buys AdMob For $750 Million

November 9, 2009

Pretty big news as Google announced this morning that it has struck a deal to buy mobile ad network, AdMob, for $750 million in stock.

From the Associated Press:

Google already has a mobile ad delivery system, DoubleClick Mobile, which it got with its $3.2 billion acquisition of DoubleClick Inc. in 2008. Google said buying AdMob will give it more expertise in a market that is expected to grow rapidly over the next several years.

Omar Hamoui founded AdMob in 2006. The company, which is based in San Mateo, Calif., provides a market for advertisers to buy space on Web sites geared for mobile devices.

“Mobile advertising has enormous potential as a marketing medium and while this industry is still in the early stages of development, AdMob has already made exceptional progress in a very short time,” Susan Wojcicki, Google’s vice president of product management, said in a statement.

From TechCrunch:

Google has just announced that it has acquired AdMob, the mobile ad platform that has been especially popular on the iPhone, for $750 million. This is a big win for the company’s early investors, which include Sequoia Capital and Accel Partners (this is a huge day for Accel — they were also investors in Playfish, which was just acquired by EA). More recent investors include DFJ and Northgate Capital.

Google has set up a website to explain the benefits of the AdMob acquisition, detailing the rapidly growing (and still very nascent) mobile advertising space. Google also created the graphic below to highlight the differences between its own mobile search ads, and the display ads AdMob shows in applications on the iPhone and other platforms.

From Reuters:

The all-stock deal gives Google, whose Android software is increasingly used to power smartphones such as the Motorola Inc Droid, an important element to monetize mobile Internet traffic.

Privately held AdMob makes technology for serving display ads on mobile phones and to track the performance of the ads.

Google, the world’s No.1 Internet search engine, does not disclose how much of its revenue, which totaled nearly $22 billion in 2008, comes from mobile ads.

TwitterPeek Launches

November 3, 2009

A new gadget designed specifically for people who want to tweet on the go was launched today by a company known as Peek.

Just tweeting? That’s it?

You’ll have to read Sascha Segan’s review on PC Magazine for more information. Here’s a hint of what he thought…he gave it 1.5 out of 5 stars!

From PC Magazine:

A neat idea executed poorly, the cute li’l TwitterPeek will probably sell well this holiday season, aided by credulous blog posts and fawning fashion magazines. That’s because its concept is pretty buzzy: a bargain-basement Twitter-only handheld with a hip design. Just don’t expect it to work well or in many ways at all.

Let’s get the buzz out of the way. TwitterPeek is frickin’ adorable. It looks like a high-end, shrunken-down Scandinavian Speak n’ Spell. It’s a powder-blue or charcoal-gray, 4 by 2.7 by 0.4 inch slab, and it feels surprisingly solid thanks to its soft-touch front and metal back. The 2.5-inch, 320-by-240 screen shows eight lines of text plus status information. The QWERTY keyboard has nicely spaced keys, though you navigate mostly with a clumsy, stiff trackwheel attached to the side. Peek says the TwitterPeek has about three days of battery life, and my model lived up to that claim.

From CNET:

TwitterPeek, which looks like a smartphone, features a QWERTY keyboard and comes in black or aqua blue.

The idea behind TwitterPeek is simple. After buying the device, users need only to input their Twitter credentials to get going. The gadget lets them tweet, reply, retweet, send direct messages, and download followers. It supports one account at a time. Users can also view TwitPics by clicking the “view content” option from the TwitterPeek menu. The company claims its battery lasts three to four days with average usage.

Included in the price of TwitterPeek is a service plan. According to the company, users can access Twitter nationwide through Peek’s own “mobile network,” which accesses mobile-phone networks. If users choose to pay $99 at the time of purchase, they will get the TwitterPeek device and six months of Peek service. After that, they need to pay $7.95 per month for network access. If customers plunk down $199, they’ll get the device and service for the life of the product. In either case, TwitterPeek allows for unlimited tweeting.

Microsoft Recovers (Most of) Lost Sidekick Data

October 15, 2009

Microsoft announced this morning that it has been able to recover the personal data lost of most of its T-Mobile Sidekick users.

From the Wall Street Journal:

The Redmond, Wash., software giant said that most, if not all, customer data was recovered and that the company would begin restoring data as soon as it has validated it. The company said it will start with personal contacts and move on to the lost calendar, notes, tasks, and pictures as quickly as possible.

The fix comes as Microsoft suffers through a public backlash after mishandling the information found on the Sidekick line of messaging phones, which are popular with teenagers. T-Mobile has already offered affected subscribers a free month of data services and a $100 gift card. At least one customer has filed a lawsuit against both companies.

Microsoft said the problem affected a minority of Sidekick users.

T-Mobile said it was pleased with the progress.

“T-Mobile’s sole focus remains helping Sidekick customers recover from this disruption,” said spokesman David Beigie.

Windows 7 to Cost Students $30

September 18, 2009

Microsoft is planning to offer a huge discount for college students who want to pick up a copy of their upcoming Windows 7.

From CNET:

Starting October 1–and for a limited time–those in the U.K. will be able to preorder Windows 7 for 30 British pounds, according to a Microsoft Web site. In a Twitter posting, Microsoft said that U.S. college students will be able to get the software for $30, but the Web site it linked to does not yet have details on the offer.

“This offer is specifically designed for those students who are not planning to purchase a new PC this year but would still like to take advantage of what Windows 7 offers,” a Microsoft representative said. Those who order the software will be able to download it when Windows 7 ships on October 22. Students interested in the deal need a valid college e-mail address.

Microsoft plans similar offers in Canada, Australia, Korea, Mexico, France, and Germany, though the prices will vary somewhat.

In the U.S., students can preorder their copy of Windows 7 beginning later Thursday, while those in most other countries where the deal is being offered will have to wait to order until October 22. In most markets, the offer will end on January 3, though it will run longer in some places, such as Australia, where it will be available through the end of March.

No Windows Mobile For Palm

September 18, 2009

Palm has announced that the company will abandon the Windows Mobile platform in favor of its own webOS mobile operating system.

From InformationWeek:

“We’ve made the decision to dedicate all future development resources to the evolution of webOS,” said Palm CEO Jon Rubenstein, in a conference call with investors, according to numerous industry blogs. “Going forward, our roadmap will include only Palm webOS-based devices,” Rubinstein reportedly said.

Palm’s webOS powers its new Pre device, which the company is positioning as an alternative to RIM (NSDQ: RIMM)’s ubiquitous Blackberry for road warriors and other business professionals. Other Palm offerings, like the popular Treo, run Windows Mobile.Reasons behind the move were not immediately clear, but Palm’s decision to ditch Windows Mobile in favor of its own technology means that it won’t have to pay licensing fees to Microsoft for the phones it sells. Palm needs to shore up its bottom line, as the company on Thursday reported a quarterly net loss of $161.1 million, compared to a loss of $39.5 million for the same period a year ago.

Motorola Introduces Android Phone

September 10, 2009

Motorola unveiled its first device using Google’s Android system today, hoping that it will attract consumers looking to use their phones to connect with friends, family and colleagues.

From the Associated Press:

The Cliq comes with a touch screen and a standard, “QWERTY” keyboard that slides out from its side. Software on it will let users aggregate contact information from various social networks and e-mail accounts. Small application “widgets” will show such information as your friends’ Facebook status updates on the home screen.

The new device also sports a five-megapixel camera, allowing for sharper images than most other phones, including Apple Inc.’s iPhone and its three-megapixel resolution.

The Cliq, which Motorola unveiled Thursday during a GigaOM mobile Internet conference in San Francisco, will be available from wireless carrier T-Mobile in time for the holiday season. Pricing and release details will be announced within three weeks.

Motorola plans to unveil a second Android phone in the coming weeks. It will also be available for the holidays, most likely through Verizon Wireless, which has already said it will be one of the U.S. carriers for a Motorola smart phone.

From IDG News Service:

The touch-screen phone will use an upcoming Internet-based service for Motorola phones called MotoBlur, which will integrate information from users’ contacts on a variety of social-networking services including Facebook, Twitter and MySpace. MotoBlur users will be able to combine their contacts on all those networks into one contact list, organize their own groups or divide contacts by social network, according to Sanjay Jha, co-CEO of Motorola and CEO of the company’s Mobile Devices group.

The Cliq, unveiled at the Mobilize conference in San Francisco, will have a slideout QWERTY keyboard as well as a touch screen. It will come with Wi-Fi as well as 3G (third-generation) connectivity, a 5-megapixel camera that can shoot video at 24 frames per second and a standard 3.5mm headphone jack.


Palm Pre Hits June 6

May 19, 2009

Looks like the Palm Pre will be available June 6 for about $200. This comes with a new two-year contract from Sprint.

Check out the story from Marin Perez at InformationWeek for more information!

From InformationWeek:

Once the undisputed U.S. leader of the smartphone market, Palm has been thoroughly outpaced by the likes of Apple and Research In Motion (NSDQ: RIMM). The Pre, which was introduced at January’s Consumer Electronics Show, was well-received by the press, and Palm is looking to use it as a springboard for a comeback.

With a large capacitive touch screen, Wi-Fi, 3G, GPS, 8 GB of storage, and Bluetooth, the Pre stacks up well against rivals like the iPhone 3G, BlackBerry Storm, and the T-Mobile (Android) G1. One of the most appealing features of the Pre is webOS, the operating system that combines a variety of online services into a finger-friendly user interface.