Posted tagged ‘President Clinton’

Bill Clinton Hospitalized

February 11, 2010

Former President Bill Clinton has been hospitalized with chest pains at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.

I’m waiting to start hearing the “Too Much McDonald’s” lines…

From CNN:

“Today President Bill Clinton was admitted to the Columbia Campus of New York Presbyterian Hospital after feeling discomfort in his chest,” said Douglas Band, counselor to the former president, in a written statement.

“Following a visit to his cardiologist, he underwent a procedure to place two stents in one of his coronary arteries. President Clinton is in good spirits, and will continue to focus on the work of his Foundation and Haiti’s relief and long-term recovery efforts. In 2004, President Clinton underwent a successful quadruple bypass operation to free four blocked arteries.”

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Did Clinton Meet Kim Jong Il Look-Alike?

October 30, 2009

Some people think so. I’m not so sure but it’s REALLY hard to tell!

From Yahoo! News:

A number of analysts here are convinced that not all the photos being released of North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-il, are really photos of Kim Jong-il.

Instead, they say, a look-alike has been standing in for him on some of the 122 trips he’s reportedly made this year to the countryside, factories, cultural events, military units, and all sorts of other venues.

Some observers say the North Korean leader is too ill to make all these appearances. One Japanese analyst claims President Clinton didn’t meet with Kim Jong-il in August – he met with a Mr. Kim double.

The evidence of Kim stand-ins is far from verified, but several North Korean refugees here say that Kim has not one but several look-alikes playing his role.

Barack Obama Selects Sonia Sotomayor as Supreme Court Choice

May 26, 2009

President Barack Obama has nominated federal judge Sonia Sotomayor of New York for the Supreme Court, making the longtime federal jurist the first Latino member of the nation’s highest court.

From the Los Angeles Times:

Sotomayor, first appointed to the federal district court for the Southern District of New York by Republican President George H.W. Bush in 1991, sits on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals. She was elevated to the circuit court, one of the nation’s most prestigious, by Democratic President Bill Clinton in 1998.

Obama, who has said that he wants a new justice with “a common touch” and a measure of “empathy,” also is offering a measure of ethnic diversity to a court dominated by white men in his replacement of the retiring Justice David Souter. The nine-member court includes just one female justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and one black justice, Clarence Thomas.

“I have decided to nominate an inspiring woman, who I believe will make a great justice,” said Obama, standing with Sotomayor by his side in the East Room of the White House.

Barack Obama Becomes Nation’s 44th President

January 20, 2009

A historical moment indeed this morning as Barack Obama was sworn in as the nation’s 44th President.

I’ll never forget where I was on the morning of Tuesday, January 20, 2009. I’ll be able to tell my children that I was a witness to history. Barack Obama, the first African American elected to the highest office in the land.

Now, its my hope that President Obama can step into office and begin to fix the many problems that we are seeing in the United States today.

Thoughts?

From the New York Times:

Barack Hussein Obama became the 44th president of the United States Tuesday, and called on Americans to join him in confronting what he described as an economic crisis caused by greed but also “our collective failure to make hard choices.”

“Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real,” Mr. Obama said in his inaugural address minutes after he took the oath of office on the same bible used by Abraham Lincoln at his first inaugural in 1861. “They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America — they will be met.”

Mr. Obama, the first African American to serve as president, spoke to a sea of cheering people, hundreds of thousands of Americans packed on the National Mall from the Capitol to beyond the Washington monument. The multitude was filled with black Americans and Mr. Obama’s triumph was a special and emotional moment for them.

With his wife, Michelle, holding the Bible, Mr. Obama, the 47-year-old son of a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Africa, was sworn in just after noon, a little later than planned, and spoke immediately thereafter.

In his speech, Mr. Obama promised to take “bold and swift” action to restore the economy by creating jobs through public works projects, improving education, promoting alternative energy and relying on new technology.

“Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America,” Mr. Obama said in a prepared copy of his remarks.

The new president also noted the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the “far-reaching network of violence and hatred” that seeks to harm the country. He used strong language in pledging to confront terrorism, nuclear proliferation and other threats from abroad, saying to the nation’s enemies, “you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.”

But he also signaled a clean break from some of the Bush administration’s policies on national security. “As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals,” he said, adding that the United States is “ready to lead once more.”

He acknowledged that some are skeptical of his ability to fulfill the hope that many have in his ability to move the nation in a new direction.

“What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them – that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply,” said Mr. Obama, who ran for stressing a commitment to reduce partisanship. “The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works – whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified.”

Hundreds of thousands of people packed the National Mall from the West Front of the Capitol to beyond the Washington monument, buttoned up against the freezing chill but projecting a palpable sense of hope as Mr. Obama becomes the first African American to hold the nation’s highest elected office. It was the largest inaugural crowd in decades, perhaps the largest ever; the throng and the anticipation began building even before the sun rose.

After his speech, following a carefully designed script that played out all morning, Mr. Obama was to head inside the Capitol and sign nomination papers for the Cabinet members he chose in the weeks following his Nov. 4 victory. The Senate is to confirm some of those new Cabinet secretaries this afternoon, but Republicans planned to delay the confirmation of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of state for at least one day.

Mr. Obama, who attended church earlier in the day, had coffee with President Bush and his wife, Laura, and then rode with them in a motorcade to Capitol Hill, will then join Congressional leaders and other dignitaries at a luncheon in Statuary Hall. That will be followed by a review of the troops — his first as commander-in-chief — before he travels back downtown at the front of the inaugural parade, which he will then watch from the reviewing stand at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

The crowd, before noon, was easily well into the hundreds of thousands.

From the Associated Press:

Braving frigid temperatures, an exuberant crowd of hundreds of thousands packed the National Mall on Tuesday to celebrate the inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama as America’s first black president. He grasps the reins of power in a high-noon ceremony amid grave economic worries and high expectations.

It was the first change of administrations since the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Crowds filled the National Mall from the Lincoln Memorial to the U.S. Capitol for a glimpse of the proceedings and, in the words of many, simply “to be here.” Washington’s subway system was jammed and two downtown stations were closed when a woman was struck by a subway train.

Two years after beginning his improbable quest as a little-known, first-term Illinois senator with a foreign-sounding name, Obama moves into the Oval Office as the nation’s fourth youngest president, at 47, and the first African-American, a barrier-breaking achievement believed impossible by generations of minorities.

Around the world, Obama’s election electrified millions with the hope that America will be more embracing, more open to change.

The dawn of the new Democratic era — with Obama allies in charge of both houses of Congress — ends eight years of Republican control of the White House by George W. Bush. He leaves Washington as one of the nation’s most unpopular and divisive presidents, the architect of two unfinished wars and the man in charge at a time of economic calamity that swept away many Americans’ jobs, savings and homes.

Bush — following tradition — left a note for Obama in the top drawer of his desk in the Oval Office.

White House press secretary Dana Perino said the theme of the message — which Bush wrote on Monday — was similar to what he has said since election night: that Obama is about to begin a “fabulous new chapter” in the United States, and that he wishes him well.

The unfinished business of the Bush administration thrusts an enormous burden onto the new administration, though polls show Americans are confident Obama is on track to succeed. He has cautioned that improvements will take time and that things will get worse before they get better.

Culminating four days of celebration, the nation’s 56th inauguration day began for Obama and Vice President-elect Joe Biden with a traditional morning worship service at St. John’s Episcopal Church, across Lafayette Park from the White House. Bells pealed from the historic church’s tower as Obama and his wife, Michelle, arrived five minutes behind schedule.

The festivities won’t end until well after midnight, with dancing and partying at 10 inaugural balls.

Hillary Clinton to be Nominated as Secretary of State

November 21, 2008

According to sources close to the Obama administration, Hillary Clinton is on track to be nominated for the position of Secretary of State. Clinton traveled to Chicago last week to meet with Obama about the Cabinet position and it is expected that an announcement will be made shortly after Thanksgiving.

From Bloomberg:

Senator Hillary Clinton is likely to be nominated for secretary of state after the Nov. 27 U.S. Thanksgiving holiday, according to an aide to President-elect Barack Obama.

Potential hurdles related to financial disclosures by Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, have been worked out, said the aide, who asked not to be named.

Clinton has indicated some hesitancy about accepting the position. She has been wrestling with whether to abandon her independence to become the nation’s top diplomat or remain in the Senate where a lack of seniority limits her influence, the New York Times reported yesterday.

Should the New York Democrat accept the post, she would be Obama’s highest-ranking Cabinet officer — the secretary of state is fourth in the line of presidential succession. Backers say the popularity of both Hillary and Bill Clinton overseas would be a boon to the U.S.’s global reputation.

From the Washington Post:

Days of back and forth followed the meeting between President-elect Barack Obama and Clinton last week in Chicago, when the two principals first discussed the post, with advisers to Clinton suggesting she might not want the job and questions persisting about the business work and international ties of her husband, former president Bill Clinton.

But the former president agreed to a thorough vetting, and Obama advisers did not back away from reports that the New York senator was the president-elect’s top pick. On Thursday night, aides said that the vetting issues have been resolved, and the selection could occur soon, perhaps immediately after Thanksgiving.

President Bush Reflects on Moments He Regrets

November 12, 2008

I have a feeling that there were quite a few moments he regretted over the past 8 years.

From the Boston Globe:

President Bush wouldn’t spill about his private Oval Office meeting Monday with his successor, saying the best way for Barack Obama to feel comfortable seeking his counsel is to keep such discussions under wraps.

“So, we had a very private conversation,” Bush said on CNN this afternoon. “It was relaxed. It was interesting to watch a person who is getting ready to assume the office of the president. This will be a fantastic experience for he and his family.

“He didn’t need my advice about supporting the military. He knows he must do that,” the president added. “And we had a good conversation. I was very pleased. And I remember the conversation I had with my predecessor, Bill Clinton. As a matter of fact, I called him yesterday. And, you know, I said, Bill, I’m getting ready to meet with the new president, and I remember how gracious you were to me and I hope I can be as gracious to President-elect Obama as you were to me.

“And so President-elect Obama has a great opportunity. And I really do wish him all the best. I mean, I am just as American as he is American. And it is good for our country that the president succeeds. And so the transition that we’re working with him on is a genuine effort to help him be able to deal with the pressures and the complicated issues of the presidency.”

Bush did say he had some regrets about his presidency, including “saying some things I shouldn’t have said.”

From the BBC:

As his presidency draws to an end, he told CNN that some remarks on Osama Bin Laden and the Iraqi insurgency would have been better left unsaid.

Mr Bush also said he regretted speaking in front of a “mission accomplished” banner only a month after troops were deployed in Iraq.

Separately he said President-elect Barack Obama would be good for the US.

Mr Bush said he regretted using phrases like “dead or alive” or “bring ’em on”.

Shortly after the 11 September attacks in 2001, he said of Osama bin Laden: “I want justice. There’s an old poster out West that said: ‘Wanted, dead or alive.'”

Obama Calls on Experts for Advice on the Economy

November 7, 2008

Any help that he can get would be much appreciated by the nation. President-elect Barack Obama is calling on economic experts to discuss the first steps toward healing a damaged economy as he forms a new administration in the face of a worsening crisis.

From the Associated Press:

“We’re not starting from nowhere,” said Lawrence Summers, a Treasury secretary under President Clinton and one of the 17 members of Obama’s transition economic advisory board who were to meet Friday with Obama.

“Throughout his campaign the president-elect has been talking about what we need to do. We need to put the middle class at the center of the policy approach in a way that it hasn’t been these last years,” Summers told NBC’s “Today.”

Leaders of business, government and academia to meet with Obama and Vice President-elect Joe Biden include executives from Xerox Corp., Time Warner Inc., Google Inc. and the Hyatt hotel company. Investor Warren Buffett was participating by telephone.

Obama also was holding his first news conference as president-elect after the meeting.

It was to be Obama’s first public appearance since Tuesday’s election, where exit polls showed that the economy was far and away the top issue for voters. More evidence of a recession came Friday when the government reported that the unemployment rate had jumped from 6.1 percent in September to 6.5 percent in October.

Obama has been meeting privately with his transition team, receiving congratulatory phone calls from U.S. allies and intelligence briefings, and making decisions about who will help run his government.