Posted tagged ‘Palin Pregnant’

Sarah Palin’s “Secret Adoption”?

September 2, 2009

In an upcoming interview with Vanity Fair, Levi Johnston reveals that Sarah Palin had a plan to adopt he and Bristol Palin’s child as her own before word got out that her daughter was pregnant.

From the article:

“Sarah told me she had a great idea: we would keep it a secret — nobody would know that Bristol was pregnant. She told me that once Bristol had the baby she and Todd would adopt him. That way, she said, Bristol and I didn’t have to worry about anything.”

Bristol Palin Wishes Pregnancy Could Have Come Later

February 17, 2009

Bristol Palin says that she loves motherhood, but the daughter of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin says she’s not getting much sleep these days.

From the Associated Press:

Bristol Palin says in a two-part interview on Fox News Channel’s “On the Record” that she wishes her pregnancy had “happened in, like, 10 years so I could have a job and an education and be, like, prepared and have my own house and stuff.”

Palin goes on to say that son Tripp, born Dec. 27, brings her so much joy, she doesn’t regret having him at all. She’s engaged to the baby’s father, Levi Johnston.

The governor also made an appearance in the interview, which took place Sunday in Fairbanks.

Part one of the interview aired Monday night and the second part was scheduled to air Tuesday night.

From the New York Times:

Bristol Palin, Gov. Sarah Palin’s 18-year-old daughter, sat for her first interview since giving birth to Tripp, which aired Monday on Fox News Channel’s “On the Record with Greta Van Susteren.”

News of the unmarried high school student’s pregnancy emerged within days of her mother’s introduction as Senator John McCain’s running mate in August. In addition to being a mother, Ms. Palin appears to be embracing a potential role as an advocate against teen pregnancy, saying that abstinence is “not realistic.”

Ms. Palin, who said she was “exhausted,” at moments seemed to have a poise and world-weariness that belied her age. But there were still flashes of a defiant teenager.

She said she had been particularly irritated by media rumors that her mother, a social conservative, had forced her to have the baby.

“It doesn’t matter what my mom’s views are on it,” she said. “It was my decision, and I wish people would realize that, too.”

Though she declined to elaborate, Ms. Palin’s views on abstinence appear to differ from those her mother, a proponent of abstinence-until-marriage education, would like to see espoused.

“Everyone should be abstinent, but it’s just not realistic at all,” she said, adding that among people her age, “it’s more and more accepted now.” But though she said she hoped her story would help change that acceptance, she did not advocate the use of contraception or go into greater detail as to how to prevent teen pregnancy.

When Ms. Van Susteren asked if she knew how to take care of a baby, Ms. Palin responded, “Yeah,” with a note of irritation. She added, “Because I’ve been babysitting my whole life. So it’s not just the baby part of it that’s hard, it’s just realizing that I’m not living for myself anymore; I’m living for another human being.”

Sarah Palin’s Speech Shows Confidence, Takes Shots at Barack Obama

September 4, 2008

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin told delegates at the Republican National Convention last night that she’s an outsider ready to join John McCain in helping to bring “real” change to Washington.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Sarah Palin accepted her party’s nomination for the vice presidency last night to the boisterous excitement of gathered Republicans, employing oratorical sparkle to argue for her qualifications as a reform candidate and her “servant’s heart,” slam the record of Barack Obama, and lionize running mate John McCain.

Mr. McCain, she argued, is an “upright and honorable man, the kind of fellow whose name you will find on war memorials in small towns across this great country, only he was among those who came home.” And she called him a wise and compassionate man who has “seen evil,” knows how to confront it, and is fit for “the most powerful office on earth.” “There is only one man in this election who has ever really fought for you in places where winning means survival and defeat means death,” she said, “and that man is John McCain.”

Reviews of the speech were generally strong. The Washington Post said Gov. Palin “proved to be an instant jolt of energy for a political party that has been worried and demoralized for much of 2008,” while the New York Times said she “electrified a convention that has been consumed by questions of whether she was up to the job.” The Wall Street Journal notes she was trying “to take all the problems and controversies that have arisen since her nomination” and “turn them into assets with mainstream voters,” and that this “went down well with the party stalwarts” at the convention, repeatedly drawing sustained applause, supportive chants and boos for those she villainized.

But “the broader question was how her speech would play to the audience beyond,” the Journal says, “a question that was impossible to answer immediately.” Following the convention, the Times adds, Gov. Palin “moves into a national campaign where she will have to appeal to audiences that are not necessarily primed to adore her” and “navigate far less controlled campaign settings that will test not only her political skills but also her knowledge of foreign and domestic policy.” Still, Roll Call dubbed her speech “the marquee event” of the convention, and its success raised the bar for the speech of Mr. McCain set for tonight.

The Associated Press has the full text of the speech. It was a big night for Palin and she delivered a speech which took direct shots at Barack Obama and his campaign. It will be interesting to see how the polls react following both national conventions and the entire Bristol Palin/Levi Johnston pregnancy. Thoughts?

Can a Working Mother Of Three Be The Vice President?

September 3, 2008

This is a question which has been debated in the media and by people since Sarah Palin was announced as John McCain’s choice for his running mate. Now we find out that she has a pregnant 17-year-old, an infant with Down syndrome, three other kids as well as a husband. The question still remains, can Sarah Palin be mom, wife and vice president of the U.S.?

From the New York Times:

When Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska was introduced as a vice-presidential pick, she was presented as a magnet for female voters, the epitome of everymom appeal.

But since then, as mothers across the country supervise the season’s final water fights and pack book bags, some have voiced the kind of doubts that few male pundits have dared raise on television. With five children, including an infant with Down syndrome and, as the country learned Monday, a pregnant 17-year-old, Ms. Palin has set off a fierce argument among women about whether there are enough hours in the day for her to take on the vice presidency, and whether she is right to try.

It’s the Mommy Wars: Special Campaign Edition. But this time the battle lines are drawn inside out, with social conservatives, usually staunch advocates for stay-at-home motherhood, mostly defending her, while some others, including plenty of working mothers, worry that she is taking on too much.

Ms. Palin was selected by Senator John McCain in part to draw female voters, as Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and Representative Geraldine A. Ferraro did before her. But Mrs. Clinton and Ms. Ferraro ran for president and vice president when their children were grown, meaning they were survivors of — not combatants in — the bitter debates over whether and how to combine work with motherhood.

People will debate whether Sarah Palin can do the job or not up until the election. While I may or may not vote for John McCain, I still think that Palin deserves the opportunity to prove that she is a credible candidate and I believe that she is. Yes, there will be controversy, but this is shaping up to be a very interesting election which will likely go down to the wire. Thoughts?

The Republicans Strike Back…

September 3, 2008

No, Darth Vader did not appear, lightsaber in hand. But Fred Thompson did take Vader-like control of the evening with a rousing speech criticizing the inexperience of Barack Obama.

Republicans, led by Thompson, assailed Barack Obama as the most liberal, least experienced White House nominee in history this evening and President Bush led the praise for GOP candidate John McCain. Republican delegates rallied behind vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin in the face of fresh controversy.

Jim Young, Reuters

Credit: Jim Young, Reuters

From USA Today:

Eight years after he accepted the vice presidential nomination at the Democratic convention, Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman, the featured speaker Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention, made the case for Republican candidate John McCain.

AP Photo/Ron Edmonds

Credit: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds

“I’m here to support John McCain because country matters more than party,” Lieberman said. “I am here tonight for a simple reason, because John McCain’s whole life testifies to a great truth: being a Democrat or a Republican is important. But it is nowhere near as important as being an American.”

From the New York Times:

If John McCain wants voters to conclude, as he argues, that he has more independence and experience and better judgment than Barack Obama, he made a bad start by choosing Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska.

Mr. McCain’s supporters are valiantly trying to argue that the selection was a bold stroke that shows their candidate is a risk-taking maverick who — we can believe — will change Washington. (Mr. Obama’s call for change — now “the change we need” — has become all the rage in St. Paul.)

To us, it says the opposite. Mr. McCain’s snap choice of Ms. Palin reflects his impulsive streak: a wild play that he made after conservative activists warned him that he would face an all-out revolt in the party if he chose who he really wanted — Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Former Republican presidential candidate Fred Thompson defended John McCain’s running mate, Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as a victim of left-wing media attacks who fear what she represents. The crowd went wild.

“What a breath of fresh air Gov. Sarah Palin is,” Thompson told the cheering delegates tonight. “She’s from a small town with small town values. Well, apparently that’s not good enough for folks that are out there attacking her and her family.”

Thompson by Emmanuel Dunand, AFP/Getty Images; Lieberman by Susan Walsh, AP

Credit: Thompson by Emmanuel Dunand, AFP/Getty Images; Lieberman by Susan Walsh, AP

Palin disclosed Monday that her unmarried 17-year-old daughter is pregnant and will marry the father. She’s been under intense media scrutiny in recent days for a variety of reasons, including an investigation over whether she abused her office to try and fire her former brother-in-law and her history of securing earmarks for her state. McCain regularly touts his opposition to earmarks on the campaign trail.

Thompson blamed “media big shots” who attack her because she doesn’t “talk a good game” on Sunday talk shows and “hit the Washington cocktail party circuit.”

Palin has “got the other side and their friends in the media in a state of panic,” Thompson said, touting the one credential she brings to the Republican ticket that no one else can claim. Well, besides being a woman. “She’s the only candidate who knows how to field-dress a moose,” he quipped.

AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall

Credit: AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall

From the Associated Press:

“God only made one John McCain, and he is his own man,” declared Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the 2000 Democratic presidential nominee, awarded a prime-time turn at the Republicans’ convention podium.

Obama drew criticism when Lieberman said the Democratic presidential candidate voted to cut off funding “for our troops on the ground” in Iraq last year.

And again when former Sen. Fred Thompson scoffed at the 47-year-old Illinois senator, who is seeking to become the first black president.

“Democrats present a history-making nominee for president. History making in that he is the most liberal, most inexperienced nominee ever to run for president,” Thompson said as delegates roared their agreement.

John McCain Opposed Money For Teen Pregnancy Programs

September 2, 2008

Senator John McCain, whose running mate, Sarah Palin, disclosed this weekend that her unmarried 17-year-old daughter is pregnant, has opposed proposals to spend federal money on teen-pregnancy prevention programs. He has also voted to require poor teen mothers to stay in school or lose their benefits.

From the Associated Press:

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s announcement Monday about her daughter Bristol was aimed at rebutting Internet rumors that Palin’s youngest son, born in April, was actually her daughter’s. Palin said her daughter intends to raise her child and marry the baby’s father, identified in news reports as Levi Johnston, 18, of Wasilla, a high school hockey player whom Bristol has dated for about one year. The baby is due in late December.

McCain’s record on issues surrounding teen pregnancy and contraceptives during his more than two decades in the Senate indicates that he and Palin have similar views. Until Monday, when the subject surfaced in a deeply personal manner, teen pregnancy and sex education were not issues in the national political campaign.

Palin herself said she opposes funding sexual-education programs in Alaska.

“The explicit sex-ed programs will not find my support,” she wrote in a 2006 questionnaire distributed among gubernatorial candidates.

McCain’s position on contraceptives and teen pregnancy issues has been difficult to judge on the campaign trail, as he appears uncomfortable discussing such topics. Reporters asked the presumptive GOP presidential nominee in November 2007 whether he supported grants for sex education in the United States, whether such programs should include directions for using contraceptives and whether he supports President Bush’s policy of promoting abstinence.

“Ahhh, I think I support the president’s policy,” McCain said.