Posted tagged ‘Osama’

Bin Laden Widows, Daughters Face Deportation

April 18, 2012

Osama bin Laden’s three widows and two daughters could be deported from Pakistan after their period of house detention expired.

From CNN:

A Pakistani judge ordered earlier this month that the five women be deported back to their countries of citizenship after serving their sentence for living illegally in Pakistan.

The 45-day detention period ended Tuesday night, said Aamir Khalil, the widows’ lawyer. But he said he had no information on when they would be deported.

The widows — identified by U.S. and Pakistani officials as Amal Ahmed Abdul Fateh, Khairiah Sabar and Siham Sabar — have been in Pakistani custody since U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad and killed the al Qaeda leader in May 2011.

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Radical Charged in “South Park” Case

May 20, 2011

Federal authorities are using words uttered by the co-founder of a radical Islamic group to charge him with threats against the creators of “South Park.”

From CNN:

A criminal complaint alleging the communication of threats was filed in Virginia late last week against Jesse Curtis Morton, also known as Younus Abdullah Mohammad.

A senior law enforcement source Thursday told CNN, which interviewed Morton in 2009, that the suspect is believed to be in Morocco, where he maintains Islampolicy.com, an English-language website propagating pro al Qaeda views.

That website is a successor to Revolutionmuslim.com.

Morton, a former resident of Brooklyn, New York, is the second person charged in the “South Park” case.

Osama Bin Laden Dead

May 1, 2011

The mastermind of the worst terrorist attack on American soil has been killed.

In a speech made this evening by President Barack Obama, U.S. special forces have killed Osama bin Laden.

Now…let’s see the photos…

From MSNBC:

“Justice has been done,” the president declared as crowds formed outside the White House to celebrate, singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “We Are the Champions,” NBC News reported.

Obama said the 54-year-old bin Laden, whom he called a terrorist “responsible for the murder of thousands of American men, women and children,” was killed in Pakistan earlier in the day after a firefight in a military operation that was based on U.S. intelligence. Other U.S. officials said one of bin Laden’s sons and two of his most trusted couriers also were killed, as was an unidentified woman who was used as a human shield.

“Flawed” Wiretaps Began Immediately Following 9/11

July 10, 2009

According to a report compiled by the inspectors general of the nation’s top intelligence agencies, the highly controversial no-warrant surveillance program initiated immediately after the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States relied on a “factually flawed” legal analysis.

From CNN:

The report, mandated by Congress, provides fresh context to information previously leaked in press accounts and buttressed by both congressional testimony and books written by former officials involved in the surveillance effort.

The 38-page unclassified version of the document reaches a cautious conclusion, stating that any use of the information collected under the surveillance program “should be carefully monitored.”

The program, launched by President Bush in the weeks after the September 11 attacks, allowed for — without court approval — the interception of communications into and out of the United States if there was a “reasonable basis” that one of the parties was a terrorist.

The report, though not critical of the program’s objectives, sharply criticizes the legal advice provided to the White House by the Justice Department.

Al Qaeda Legend Arrested

December 11, 2008

CNN is reporting that Belgian police have arrested a woman they called an “al Qaeda living legend” as part of an operation to thwart a terror attack being planned to coincide with an EU summit in Brussels.

From CNN:

Police seized 14 people, one of whom was planning to carry out a suicide attack in Belgium, the source said. They had contacts at the “highest levels of al Qaeda,” the source said.

The police source said officers “had only 24 hours to act.”

The leaders of the European Union’s 27 member states are meeting in Brussels Thursday and Friday. It is not clear that the heads of state and government themselves were the target of the planned attack.

The federal prosecutor’s office in Belgium identified one of the suspects as Malika El-Aroud, the widow of one of the men who assassinated a key opponent of the Taliban in Afghanistan two days before September 11, 2001.

El-Aroud’s late husband was one of two men who killed Ahmed Shah Massoud, a leader of the Northern Alliance, in a suicide mission ordered by Osama Bin Laden.

Belgian police aimed to prevent El-Aroud, whom the police source called an “al-Qaeda living legend,” from moving to Afghanistan to play a role in the fight against the coalition forces there, the source said.

She is thought to be a recruiter for the anti-Western network, rather than a fighter, the source said.

Barack Obama to Close Guantanamo Bay Prison?

November 12, 2008

It seems that this will be a priority for the Obama Administration. Barack Obama plans to launch a review of the classified files of the approximately 250 detainees at Guantanamo Bay immediately after taking office, as part of an intensive effort to close the U.S. prison in Cuba, according to people who advised the campaign on detainee issues.

From the Washington Post:

Announcing the closure of the controversial detention facility would be among the most potent signals the incoming administration could send of its sharp break with the Bush era, according to the advisers, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak for the president-elect. They believe the move would create a global wave of diplomatic and popular goodwill that could accelerate the transfer of some detainees to other countries.

But the advisers, as well as outside national security and legal experts, said the new administration will face a thicket of legal, diplomatic, political and logistical challenges to closing the prison and prosecuting the most serious offenders in the United States — an effort that could take many months or longer. Among the thorniest issues will be how to build effective cases without using evidence obtained by torture, an issue that attorneys for the detainees will almost certainly seek to exploit.