Posted tagged ‘Nuri Al-Maliki’

Iraqi Shoe Thrower a Hero in Iraq

December 19, 2008

The Iraqi journalist who hurled his shoes at President George W. Bush has won some hearts in neighboring Iran, where one cleric dubbed the act “the shoe intifada (rebellion).” Iran has opposed the U.S. presence and policies in Iraq and the United States has accused Iran of backing militants in Iraq.

From CNN:

Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati — leading Friday prayers in Tehran — hailed journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi’s now-famous fling last Sunday, when Bush and Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki were holding a news conference in Baghdad.

His remarks — reported by Iran’s state-run Islamic Republic News Agency — reflect the support many Middle East people have shown for al-Zaidi, an Iraqi correspondent for Egypt-based Al-Baghdadia TV.

“The shoe intifada in Iraq should not be overlooked easily,” he said. “Well done to the Iraqi journalist for throwing the shoes at the U.S. president.”

Speaking to worshipers at Tehran University, Jannati labeled the shoes “more valuable than crowns, medals and signs” and believes they should be place in an Iraqi museum.

The government of Iran and the United States have been bitter antagonists for decades.

Jannati said the U.S. was trapped in a quagmire in Iraq and didn’t know what to do about it.

“The shoe hurling by the Iraqi journalist had many messages which the world received and the Iraqi people, too, held demonstrations afterwards. People should support the Iraqi journalist,” said Jannati, who believes shoes should be regular props in the anti-U.S. demonstrations in Iran and Iraq.

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Iraqi Journalist Throws Shoes at President Bush

December 14, 2008

President Bush made a farewell visit Sunday to Baghdad, Iraq, where he met with Iraqi leaders and was targeted by an angry Iraqi man, who jumped up and threw shoes at Bush during a news conference. I’m sure others would have loved to have thrown more than just their shoes.

From CNN:

Among Muslims, throwing shoes at someone, or sitting so that the bottom of a shoe faces another person, is considered an insult.

The man was dragged out screaming after throwing the shoes. Bush ducked, and the shoes, thrown one at a time, sailed past his head during the news conference with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki in his palace in the heavily fortified Green Zone.

As the man continued to scream from another room, Bush said: “That was a size 10 shoe he threw at me, you may want to know.”

Bush had been lauding the conclusion of the security pact with Iraq as journalists looked on.

Bush landed at Baghdad International Airport on Sunday and traveled by helicopter to meet with President Jalal Talabani and his two vice presidents at Talabani’s palace outside the Green Zone.

It marked the first time he has been outside the heavily fortified Green Zone in Baghdad without being on a military base.

The visit was Bush’s fourth since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003.

Afterward, Talabani praised his U.S. counterpart as a “great friend for the Iraqi people” and the man “who helped us to liberate our country and to reach this day, which we have democracy, human rights, and prosperity gradually in our country.”

US Troops in Iraq Until 2015?

August 28, 2008

According to reports, the United States asked Iraq for permission to maintain a troop presence there to 2015, but US and Iraqi negotiators agreed to limit their authorization only through 2011.

From Reuters:

“It was a U.S. proposal for the date which is 2015, and an Iraqi one which is 2010, then we agreed to make it 2011. Iraq has the right, if necessary, to extend the presence of these troops,” Talabani said in an interview with al-Hurra television, a transcript of which was posted on his party’s website on Wednesday.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki said that, while overall negotiations continued, the two sides had accepted the end of 2011 as an end date for the presence of the approximately 145,000 U.S. troops stationed in Iraq.

U.S. officials stress that no final agreement has been made. A final deal will need to be approved by the Iraqi parliament.

U.S. officials in Baghdad were not immediately available for comment.