Posted tagged ‘New York Times’

L.A. Times, N.Y. Times Top Pulitzer List

April 18, 2011

The Los Angeles Times and The New York Times were awarded two Pulitzer Prizes each today for their outstanding work in journalism.

From CNN:

The New York Times’ Clifford J. Levy and Ellen Barry won in the international reporting category for their work on the struggling Russian justice system, while the paper’s David Leonhardt won for commentary.

The Los Angeles Times won in the public service category for its coverage of Bell, a small California city where officials’ sky-high salaries sparked national outrage and then arrests. The paper’s Barbara Davidson won for feature photography.

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Casey Anthony Pleads Guilty to All 13 Counts in Check Fraud Case

January 25, 2010

Please note that this post is from 2010. For the most current updates on the Casey Anthony trial, please see my homepage.

Well…finally some news!

Casey Anthony pleaded guilty to all 13 counts in her check fraud case this morning.

Credit: CNN

Judge Stan Strickland accepted the plea deal and sentenced her to 412 days (time served) and also gave her one year’s supervised probation.

She will remain jailed on a charge of first-degree murder in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee.

It seems that Casey was also in tears and apologized to Amy Huizenga. Haven’t seen any video yet, but I did see a few photos and I’m sure we will see video throughout the day!

OK…let’s hear your thoughts! 🙂

From CNN:

Anthony admitted stealing a checkbook from a friend, Amy Huizenga, and writing five checks worth $644.25. She wiped tears from her eyes as she spoke briefly in court.

“I just wanted to let everyone know that I’m sorry for what I did,” she said. “I take complete and full responsibility for my actions, and I’d like to apologize to Amy. I wish I’d been a better friend.

Attorney Jose Baez asked the court to give Anthony credit for time served and place her on probation in the check case. The judge agreed that Anthony already has spent more time in jail than any sentence she could receive in the check case.

Anthony has made full restitution, Baez said. Before her arrest, she had no prior criminal record, he added.

From the New York Times:

Casey Anthony, the Florida mother charged with killing her toddler daughter, was found guilty of check fraud Monday and sentenced to time served in jail.

Anthony, 23, was accused of going on a spending spree during the summer of 2008 — around the time her daughter disappeared — after she found the checks while borrowing a former friend’s car. Anthony started to cry as she apologized for using the checks.

”I just want everyone to know I’m sorry for what I did,” Anthony told the judge. ”I take complete and full responsibility for my actions.”

From WESH:

Judge Stan Strickland asked Anthony several questions, ensuring she was aware of what entering the plea meant — that is waiving the right to trial.

Her parents, George and Cindy Anthony, held hands in the courtroom while the plea was entered.

Jose Baez, Anthony’s attorney, asked for “equal justice” for his client, and asked for a one year probation and credit for time served.Strickland sentenced the 23-year-old to jail time served and $5,517.75 in court costs.In a rare moment, a teary Anthony addressed the court.

“I’m sorry for what I did. I’d like to sincerely apologize to Amy. I wish I would have been a better friend,” she said.

New York Times to Layoff 100

October 19, 2009

The New York Times said today that the publication will cut 100 newsroom jobs and an unspecified number elsewhere amid industry wide declines in revenue.

Another tough hit due to these difficult economic times!

From the Associated Press:

The Times will offer voluntary buyouts at first but will resort to layoffs if it cannot meet the targets.

“I hope that won’t happen, but it might,” Executive Editor Bill Keller wrote in a memo to staff.

The Times, flagship of The New York Times Co., cut its newsroom work force by 100 positions last year mostly through buyouts, but Keller said then that the newspaper had to make a “relatively small” number of involuntary cuts to meet that target.

Even with the latest cuts, amounting to 8 percent of the newsroom staff, the Times has the largest news-gathering staff of any U.S. newspaper. The cuts would leave the newsroom with about 1,150 reporters and editors.

The Times already trimmed about 100 positions from its business operations this spring and plans additional cuts. The newspaper would not say how many. The business side now employs about 1,850.

The newspaper has so far avoided the deep newsroom cutbacks that have become a regular occurrence at America’s big-city dailies.

Gawker has the full memo that was distributed by Bill Keller. Here is a sample:

“Colleagues,

I had planned to invite you to the newsroom and break this news in person today, but I’ve been hit by something that seems to be the flu. Though I strongly believe in delivering bad news in person, I don’t want to add insult to injury by spreading infection.

Let me cut to the chase: We have been told to reduce the newsroom by 100 positions between now and the end of the year.

We hope to accomplish this by offering voluntary buyouts. On Thursday, the Company will be sending buyout offers to everyone in the newsroom. Getting a buyout package does NOT mean we want you to leave. It is simply easier to send the envelopes to everyone. If you think a buyout may be right for you, you have up to 45 days to decide whether you will accept it or not.

As before, if we do not reach 100 positions through buyouts, we will be forced to go to layoffs. I hope that won’t happen, but it might.

Our colleagues in editorial and op-ed, and on the business side, also face another round of budget cuts.”

Democrats Plan to Tax the Wealthy

July 10, 2009

To pay for an overhaul of the health care system in the United States,  Democrats plan to propose a surtax on individuals earning $280,000 and up and couples earning more than $350,000.

From the New York Times:

In all, the proposal is projected to generate roughly $550 billion over 10 years, which would cover about half of the estimated cost of the $1-trillion-plus health care legislation. The balance of the cost is expected to be covered by lower government spending on Medicare and other savings in the health care system.

But it remains unclear if the Senate would approve such an across-the-board income tax on the wealthy. Although some Democrats said they would gladly vote to tax the rich to pay for an improved health care system, most if not all Republicans and some centrist Democrats seem to be opposed.

The Ways and Means chairman, Representative Charles B. Rangel of New York, said the surcharge would begin at 1 percent and would step up for individuals earning more than $400,000 and couples earning more than $500,000, and step up yet again for individuals earning $800,000 and up, and couples earning more than $1 million.

AIG Executive Offers Public Resignation

March 25, 2009

Jake DeSantis, an executive vice president of the American International Group’s financial products unit, has written a resignation letter to Edward M. Liddy, the chief executive of A.I.G., which has been published in the New York Times.

From the New York Times:

DEAR Mr. Liddy,

It is with deep regret that I submit my notice of resignation from A.I.G. Financial Products. I hope you take the time to read this entire letter. Before describing the details of my decision, I want to offer some context:

I am proud of everything I have done for the commodity and equity divisions of A.I.G.-F.P. I was in no way involved in — or responsible for — the credit default swap transactions that have hamstrung A.I.G. Nor were more than a handful of the 400 current employees of A.I.G.-F.P. Most of those responsible have left the company and have conspicuously escaped the public outrage.

After 12 months of hard work dismantling the company — during which A.I.G. reassured us many times we would be rewarded in March 2009 — we in the financial products unit have been betrayed by A.I.G. and are being unfairly persecuted by elected officials. In response to this, I will now leave the company and donate my entire post-tax retention payment to those suffering from the global economic downturn. My intent is to keep none of the money myself.

I take this action after 11 years of dedicated, honorable service to A.I.G. I can no longer effectively perform my duties in this dysfunctional environment, nor am I being paid to do so. Like you, I was asked to work for an annual salary of $1, and I agreed out of a sense of duty to the company and to the public officials who have come to its aid. Having now been let down by both, I can no longer justify spending 10, 12, 14 hours a day away from my family for the benefit of those who have let me down.

To read the rest of the letter, please click on the link above to access the article in the New York Times.

Steve Jobs Taking Leave of Absence From Apple

January 14, 2009

According to numerous news sources, Apple CEO Steve Jobs said today that he will be taking a leave of absence because of health issues. The leave of absence is expected to last until at least June.

“My health-related issues are more complex than I originally thought,” he said in a letter to employees which has been published by the New York Times.

From the statement:

Team,

I am sure all of you saw my letter last week sharing something very personal with the Apple community. Unfortunately, the curiosity over my personal health continues to be a distraction not only for me and my family, but everyone else at Apple as well. In addition, during the past week I have learned that my health-related issues are more complex than I originally thought.

In order to take myself out of the limelight and focus on my health, and to allow everyone at Apple to focus on delivering extraordinary products, I have decided to take a medical leave of absence until the end of June.

I have asked Tim Cook to be responsible for Apple’s day to day operations, and I know he and the rest of the executive management team will do a great job. As CEO, I plan to remain involved in major strategic decisions while I am out. Our board of directors fully supports this plan.

I look forward to seeing all of you this summer.

Steve

From CNET:

Apple has confirmed that CEO Steve Jobs will step down from his CEO post while recuperating from a hormone imbalance. His absence will stretch until the end of June.

Tim Cook, Apple’s chief operating officer, will run the company during Jobs’ absence, according an e-mail Jobs sent to Apple employees that was released to the media.

Jobs, 53, has been the subject of heated speculation regarding his health since last June’s Worldwide Developers Conference, when he appeared to have lost a great deal of weight. At the time, Apple insisted Jobs’ health was a private matter, but revealed in early January that Jobs was suffering from a hormone imbalance that was impeding his body’s ability to absorb certain proteins.

In August 2004 Jobs underwent successful surgery to treat a rare form of pancreatic cancer, which sidelined him until September of that year. Much of the speculation over the past year has been over whether or not that cancer has returned, which was not clear from the e-mail written by Jobs, an intensely private man.

Since his return to Apple in 1997, the mercurial founder has resurrected Apple from the depths, reviving the Mac, changing the music industry with the introduction of the iPod and iTunes, and turning the mobile phone industry on its head with the 2007 introduction of the iPhone. He is considered to be one of the single-most influential executives in the technology industry, if not U.S. business itself.

Apple has been criticized over the past few years for seeming to lack a succession plan for Jobs, who some feel can truly never be replaced. But it has never been clear whether the company was just playing its cards close to its vest regarding that plan, or whether it actually didn’t have a plan. Cook has been regarded as the short-term solution for a long time, having run the company during Jobs’ absence in 2004 and respected as a detail-oriented manager who can keep the ship on course.

From CNN:

Jobs, who announced last week that he suffered from a hormone imbalance that was caused him to lose weight, said he will be away from the job until the end of June.

“In order to take myself out of the limelight and focus on my health, and to allow everyone at Apple to focus on delivering extraordinary products, I have decided to take a medical leave of absence until the end of June,” Jobs said in a statement.

Tim Cook, the company’s chief operating officer, will be responsible for Apple’s day to day operations, according to the statement.

Apple (AAPL, Fortune 500) shares closed down $2.38 to $85.33 in Wednesday trading. They were halted after hours pending the announcement.

From InformationWeek:

Apple seems to have learned from Bill Clinton. Like our randy former chief executive being questioned about his sex life, Apple handled Steve Jobs’ ongoing health problems by making statements that were literally true, but ultimately misleading. That’s going to have Apple watchers taking a microscope to every statement and action by Apple to find out what the company really means. But Apple watchers already are doing that, so Apple doesn’t lose out.

Ever since Jobs made a gaunt appearance at the launch of the iPhone 3G this summer, Apple has been stonewalling about the founder and CEO’s health, while rumors flew about the recurrence of the cancer he was treated for in 2004. The rumors went into hyperdrive in December, when Apple announced abruptly that it was pulling out of Macworld and Jobs wasn’t speaking.

Finally, Jobs posted a statement on the Apple site last week. He acknowledged he had a “hormone imbalance” that caused him to lose weight throughout 2008. He says it’s being treated, and that he expects to regain his lost weight by spring.

That contrasts with Apple’s earlier statement, on Dec. 16, announcing that this year would be Apple’s last Macworld, and Jobs would not deliver his traditional keynote. At the time, Apple cited only business reasons for the withdrawal, saying trade shows have become a “very minor part of how Apple reaches its customers.”

The statement didn’t mention Jobs’ health. As a matter of fact, it didn’t mention Jobs at all — it just said that Philip Schiller, Apple senior VP of worldwide product marketing, will deliver the keynote, a job which has been Jobs’ for a decade.

Is Jobs’ health anyone’s business? Jupiter Research analyst Michael Gartenberg, and other Apple defenders, say no, it’s a private matter. I disagree. Jobs’ health is relevant as long as he has chosen to make himself a public figure. He is the face and spokesman for Apple, credited with its current success, and the company has no visible plan for succession. Investors identify Apple’s success with Jobs, and they’re afraid every time they think Jobs might become incapable of running the company. We see those fears when Apple’s stock drops every time Jobs sneezes or stubs a toe.

If you are the CEO of a publicly traded company, anything that might affect your abilities to perform your duties is a matter of public record. That most emphatically includes your health. Don’t like those rules? Retire. Take the company private.

And Jobs isn’t just any CEO of any public company. Jobs has chosen to make himself the public face of Apple. He has worked to build a mystique around Apple, and focused that mystique on himself as its charismatic leader. If Jobs wants to take a piece of his privacy back, the company needs to be more communicative, and put other people in front of the cameras and microphone more frequently. (Indeed, this may be one of the motivations for Schiller taking over the Macworld keynote.) Until then, Jobs’ health is going to continue to be a matter of public concern.

Squirrel on the Menu in Britain

January 8, 2009

With Britain’s need to cull the number of squirrels and save its native red squirrel from the invading grays, the rodent is showing up in restaurants and butcher shops.

From the New York Times:

RARE roast beef splashed with meaty jus, pork enrobed in luscious crackling fat, perhaps a juicy, plump chicken … these are feasts that come to mind when one thinks of quintessential British food. Lately, however, a new meat is gracing the British table: squirrel.

Though squirrel has appeared occasionally in British cookery, history doesn’t deem it a dining favorite. Even during World War II and the period of austerity that followed, the Ministry of Food valiantly promoted the joys of squirrel soup and pie. British carnivores replied, “No, thank you.”

These days, however, in farmers’ markets, butcher shops, village pubs and elegant restaurants, squirrel is selling as fast as gamekeepers and hunters can bring it in.

“Part of the interest is curiosity and novelty,” said Barry Shaw of Shaw Meats, who sells squirrel meat at the Wirral Farmers Market near Liverpool. “It’s a great conversation starter for dinner parties.”

While some have difficulty with the cuteness versus deliciousness ratio — that adorable little face, those itty-bitty claws — many feel that eating squirrel is a way to do something good for the environment while enjoying a unique gastronomical experience.

With literally millions of squirrels rampaging throughout England, Scotland and Wales at any given time, squirrels need to be controlled by culls. This means that hunters, gamekeepers, trappers and the Forestry Commission (the British equivalent of forest rangers) provide a regular supply of the meat to British butchers, restaurants, pâté and pasty makers and so forth.