Posted tagged ‘Mobile Phone’

BlackBerry Says All Service Restored

October 13, 2011

According to Research in Motion (RIM) executives, all BlackBerry service has been restored following the largest network outage in that smartphone’s history.

The outage started earlier this week in Europe and spread to North America, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America over the course through yesterday.

It appears that a failure at one of the company’s messaging servers in Europe was what set off a domino effect that reportedly caused problems for millions of BlackBerry owners.

From CNN:

“We’ve now restored full services,” RIM’s co-CEO Mike Lazaridis told reporters.

Some BlackBerry users may still see e-mails coming in slowly as the system recovers, he said.

The major outage frustrated customers on nearly every continent who were unable to send and receive e-mails and text messages this week. It also comes at a bad time for RIM, which is facing increased competition from Android and Apple smartphones.

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Average Teen Texts More Than 3,000 Times Monthly

October 15, 2010

…and I thought I texted a lot! According to recent studies, the average teenager sends over 3,000 texts per month.

From Mashable:

According to a new study from Nielsen, our society has gone mad with texting, data usage and app downloads. Nielsen analyzed the mobile data habits of over 60,000 mobile subscribers and surveyed over 3,000 teens during April, May and June of this year. The numbers they came up with are astounding.

Credit: The Nielsen Company

The number of texts being sent is on the rise, especially among teenagers age 13 to 17. According to Nielsen, the average teenager now sends 3,339 texts per month.

There’s more, though: teen females send an incredible 4,050 text per month, while teen males send an average of 2,539 texts. Teens are sending 8 percent more texts than they were this time last year.

 

Twitter Creator Unveils New Venture

December 9, 2009

Twitter creator Jack Dorsey has provided the public with the first public demonstration of his hotly-anticipated latest venture. The new venture is a device that will allow credit card payments by cell phone. And here’s the best part: it’s free!

From CNN:

Details of “Square” — a card reader which plugs into the headphone socket of most mobile devices — have been circulating on the Internet since it was announced earlier this month, but little has been known about how it works or who it was aimed at.

However, Dorsey — whose microblogging Web site has proved hugely popular but not hugely profitable since launching in March 2006 — gave no explanation on how he would make money from his new creation, beyond revealing there would be a per-transaction charity donation.

Square, a tiny cube about an inch in length, contains a magnetic strip reader that allows users to swipe and read credit cards, then deduct payment on or offline through a downloaded application that communicates with card issuers in the same way as retailer devices.

Customers then use their finger on the phone’s touch-recognition screen to sign their name to the transaction.

Is Your Mobile Phone Killing You?

November 10, 2009

Well…I hope not but according to reports, a much-anticipated, yet unreleased report from the World Health Organization will show a significantly increased risk of some brain tumors related to use of mobile phones for a period of 10 years or more.

From CNN:

Last summer, Dr. Ronald Herberman, then director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, issued a warning to about 3,000 faculty and staff, listing steps to avoid harmful electromagnetic radiation from cell phones. This included keeping the phone away from the body as much as possible and not allowing children to use cell phones except in emergencies.

Studies that looked at people who had used cell phones 10 years or longer tended to find the strongest risk of tumors. Researchers found that cell phone users had a 10 percent to 30 percent higher risk than people who barely, if ever, used this technology.

A telling feature of the findings in the stronger studies was that the side of the head against which people held their cell phones was highly correlated with the location of tumors, said Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California, Berkeley.

TwitterPeek Launches

November 3, 2009

A new gadget designed specifically for people who want to tweet on the go was launched today by a company known as Peek.

Just tweeting? That’s it?

You’ll have to read Sascha Segan’s review on PC Magazine for more information. Here’s a hint of what he thought…he gave it 1.5 out of 5 stars!

From PC Magazine:

A neat idea executed poorly, the cute li’l TwitterPeek will probably sell well this holiday season, aided by credulous blog posts and fawning fashion magazines. That’s because its concept is pretty buzzy: a bargain-basement Twitter-only handheld with a hip design. Just don’t expect it to work well or in many ways at all.

Let’s get the buzz out of the way. TwitterPeek is frickin’ adorable. It looks like a high-end, shrunken-down Scandinavian Speak n’ Spell. It’s a powder-blue or charcoal-gray, 4 by 2.7 by 0.4 inch slab, and it feels surprisingly solid thanks to its soft-touch front and metal back. The 2.5-inch, 320-by-240 screen shows eight lines of text plus status information. The QWERTY keyboard has nicely spaced keys, though you navigate mostly with a clumsy, stiff trackwheel attached to the side. Peek says the TwitterPeek has about three days of battery life, and my model lived up to that claim.

From CNET:

TwitterPeek, which looks like a smartphone, features a QWERTY keyboard and comes in black or aqua blue.

The idea behind TwitterPeek is simple. After buying the device, users need only to input their Twitter credentials to get going. The gadget lets them tweet, reply, retweet, send direct messages, and download followers. It supports one account at a time. Users can also view TwitPics by clicking the “view content” option from the TwitterPeek menu. The company claims its battery lasts three to four days with average usage.

Included in the price of TwitterPeek is a service plan. According to the company, users can access Twitter nationwide through Peek’s own “mobile network,” which accesses mobile-phone networks. If users choose to pay $99 at the time of purchase, they will get the TwitterPeek device and six months of Peek service. After that, they need to pay $7.95 per month for network access. If customers plunk down $199, they’ll get the device and service for the life of the product. In either case, TwitterPeek allows for unlimited tweeting.

Microsoft Recovers (Most of) Lost Sidekick Data

October 15, 2009

Microsoft announced this morning that it has been able to recover the personal data lost of most of its T-Mobile Sidekick users.

From the Wall Street Journal:

The Redmond, Wash., software giant said that most, if not all, customer data was recovered and that the company would begin restoring data as soon as it has validated it. The company said it will start with personal contacts and move on to the lost calendar, notes, tasks, and pictures as quickly as possible.

The fix comes as Microsoft suffers through a public backlash after mishandling the information found on the Sidekick line of messaging phones, which are popular with teenagers. T-Mobile has already offered affected subscribers a free month of data services and a $100 gift card. At least one customer has filed a lawsuit against both companies.

Microsoft said the problem affected a minority of Sidekick users.

T-Mobile said it was pleased with the progress.

“T-Mobile’s sole focus remains helping Sidekick customers recover from this disruption,” said spokesman David Beigie.

No Windows Mobile For Palm

September 18, 2009

Palm has announced that the company will abandon the Windows Mobile platform in favor of its own webOS mobile operating system.

From InformationWeek:

“We’ve made the decision to dedicate all future development resources to the evolution of webOS,” said Palm CEO Jon Rubenstein, in a conference call with investors, according to numerous industry blogs. “Going forward, our roadmap will include only Palm webOS-based devices,” Rubinstein reportedly said.

Palm’s webOS powers its new Pre device, which the company is positioning as an alternative to RIM (NSDQ: RIMM)’s ubiquitous Blackberry for road warriors and other business professionals. Other Palm offerings, like the popular Treo, run Windows Mobile.Reasons behind the move were not immediately clear, but Palm’s decision to ditch Windows Mobile in favor of its own technology means that it won’t have to pay licensing fees to Microsoft for the phones it sells. Palm needs to shore up its bottom line, as the company on Thursday reported a quarterly net loss of $161.1 million, compared to a loss of $39.5 million for the same period a year ago.