Posted tagged ‘Mobile Internet’

Motorola Introduces Android Phone

September 10, 2009

Motorola unveiled its first device using Google’s Android system today, hoping that it will attract consumers looking to use their phones to connect with friends, family and colleagues.

From the Associated Press:

The Cliq comes with a touch screen and a standard, “QWERTY” keyboard that slides out from its side. Software on it will let users aggregate contact information from various social networks and e-mail accounts. Small application “widgets” will show such information as your friends’ Facebook status updates on the home screen.

The new device also sports a five-megapixel camera, allowing for sharper images than most other phones, including Apple Inc.’s iPhone and its three-megapixel resolution.

The Cliq, which Motorola unveiled Thursday during a GigaOM mobile Internet conference in San Francisco, will be available from wireless carrier T-Mobile in time for the holiday season. Pricing and release details will be announced within three weeks.

Motorola plans to unveil a second Android phone in the coming weeks. It will also be available for the holidays, most likely through Verizon Wireless, which has already said it will be one of the U.S. carriers for a Motorola smart phone.

From IDG News Service:

The touch-screen phone will use an upcoming Internet-based service for Motorola phones called MotoBlur, which will integrate information from users’ contacts on a variety of social-networking services including Facebook, Twitter and MySpace. MotoBlur users will be able to combine their contacts on all those networks into one contact list, organize their own groups or divide contacts by social network, according to Sanjay Jha, co-CEO of Motorola and CEO of the company’s Mobile Devices group.

The Cliq, unveiled at the Mobilize conference in San Francisco, will have a slideout QWERTY keyboard as well as a touch screen. It will come with Wi-Fi as well as 3G (third-generation) connectivity, a 5-megapixel camera that can shoot video at 24 frames per second and a standard 3.5mm headphone jack.


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iPhone to Add Cut and Paste Features

March 16, 2009

The founder of social news site Digg Kevin Rose has claimed to have a handful of details on what Apple will announce in its iPhone OS 3.0 unveiling tomorrow.

The cut and paste features sound interesting. Let’s see what is announced tomorrow.

From Ars Technica:

Among Rose’s mentionable tidbits is that copy and paste should finally arrive, and he even offered a believable explanation, a clip of which is embedded below, of how the feature will work.

Rose explains that, in iPhone OS 3.0, double-tapping a word will display a magnifying-glass-like icon that contains two draggable quotation marks. Drag the marks around the word or chunk of text you want to copy, and a contextual menu will appear, offering options to copy or paste. This sounds fairly plausible, and at least as good of a UI implementation as any of the previous mockups of how this feature could work. It is worth noting that Rose has a pretty good Apple rumor track record, nailing some announcements like the 4G iPod nano, the original iPhone, and iTunes 8. The full Diggnation episode (number 194), recorded live at SXSW this past weekend, is not yet up on the Revision3 Diggnation site. You will have to deal with the brief clips for now. Unfortunately, Rose does not get into specifics of just how far this copy and paste functionality will reach.

Google’s Android smartphone OS, for example, only allows the feature to shuffle around words in text boxes. Will iPhone OS 3.0 allow users to copy text from a webpage and paste it into an e-mail or a text box on the page for posting to forums? What about more ad-hoc behavior, such as copying details from a profile in the Facebook app for pasting into the iPhone’s internal Address Book?

From ZDNet:

According to Kevin Rose during a segment of Diggnation (video) the long-awaited copy and paste functionality will be demonstrated at Thursday’s iPhone OS 3.0 media event in Cupertino.

The revelation occurred during Diggnation #194 which was recorded live at Stubbs in Austin, Texas, during SxSW Interactive 2009. In it Rose reveals that copy and paste will be invoked by double tapping on a word, and a magnifier bubble will appear with two quotes that you can drag around your selection. Once you make your selection, you will have options to cut, copy or paste.

In the same segment Rose says that background apps and video didn’t make the cut for 3.0 but that the iPhone would catch up with all the features coming in the Palm Pre.

MacRumors adds that Copy and Paste will be arriving in 3.0 alongside a much improved homepage/springboard with the ability to organize in categories.

CES: Las Vegas

January 7, 2009

Gil Grissom may be leaving CSI this week, but people are just arriving in Las Vegas for one of the biggest shows of the year.

It’s expected that while attendance may be down slightly this year due to the struggling economy, as many as 130,000 attendees will be converging on the city for the 42nd annual International Consumer Electronics Show.

The show always has a great lineup of speakers and this year will be no different (minus Bill Gates of course). For those of you who are already in Vegas, and plan to leave the comfort of the hotels and casinos for the show, make sure to check out clients from ACCESS, mBlox and Nero on these thought provoking panels at Digital Hollywood, co-located at CES:

Thursday, January 8

10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Track III- ME6- Mobile Entertainment Track

Reinventing the Mobile Device and Mobile Network- Integrating the Full PC Experience into a Personal Communications Device

Albert Chu, VP of Marketing & Alliances, ACCESS Systems America


For Session Description & Speaker Bios Click Here

Thursday, January 8

Noon to 1 p.m.

Track III- ME7, Mobile Entertainment Track

The Mobile Web: The Future of Applications, Commerce, GPS, Communications and Content

Larry Berkin, VP, Ecosystem and Corporate Business Development, ACCESS Systems America


For Session Description & Speaker Bios Click Here

Thursday, January 8

3 to 4 p.m.

Track III- ME9- Mobile Entertainment Track

Mobile Commerce and Content- The Mobile Web, Off Deck Content, Mobile Search and Advertising Options

Brian Johnson, Senior Vice President, Americas and Asia Pacific, mBlox


For Session Description & Speaker Bios Click Here

Additionally, Nero US President, Richard Carriere, will be a featured speaker on January 9, at 3 p.m. in the North Hall – N261. His panel, “The Television, the PC, Online Video and the Digital Consumer Experience” will discuss consumers’ use of TV as the gateway to entertainment and information. Included in the discussion will be the topics of interactive TV, IPTV, PVR TV, broadband-based TV, as well as the many ways that consumers will use and access content and programming.

Nero Move it, Nero 9 and Nero LiquidTV | TiVo PC will be showcased at the AMD-sponsored Nero Theater at the Nero booth, January 8-10 in the Las Vegas Convention Center, South Hall 4, #35625.

Nero and OEM partner product trials and promotional giveaways will also be offered at the Nero Theater, with the first demonstration of Nero 9 at 11 a.m. PT, Nero LiquidTV | TiVo PC at 1 p.m. PT, and Nero Move it at 3 p.m. PT. This newly expanded Nero product line represents the company’s delivery of liquid media technology — where the TV and PC are merged and digital entertainment content moves easily across a variety of devices.

If you’re interested in meeting one-on-one with Nero at CES, please contact Karen Clyne at (408) 727-0351 ext 763 or karenc@mcgrathpower.com.

It should be a great show once again this year. Looking for more information? CNN has a great preview of the show today.

From CNN:

With many Americans struggling to pay bills, find jobs and even avoid foreclosure, it may seem like an extravagance to spend hundreds of dollars on a laptop or a digital camera.

But financial fears also are causing consumers to spend more time at home, where they still want to be entertained. Industry observers believe this nesting trend could sustain demand for products — Blu-ray players, stereos, video games, cheap computers — that brighten the family room while easing the sting of canceling that Disney World vacation.

“We’re about to experience a renaissance in in-home entertainment,” said Scott Steinberg, publisher of DigitalTrends.com. “History proves that even during times of recession, people are willing to invest heavily in great escapes, and products that take their mind off the concerns and vagaries of everyday life.

“That being said, consumers are becoming smarter about how they spend their money,” he added. “This year’s mindset will be less about luxury than convenience, and a specific gadget or technology’s pure ability at the end of the day to get the job done.”

With an uneasy eye on the economy, tech companies seem to be scaling back expectations for CES, which kicks off officially on Thursday. Attendance will likely be down about 8 percent, and few blockbuster announcements are expected. Industry heavyweights also are downsizing the usual slate of lavish corporate parties that in 2006 saw the Foo Fighters gigging for Motorola and Intel hosting The Black Eyed Peas.

“The pre-buzz has really been a lot quieter than it’s been in recent years,” said Kent German, a senior editor at CNET.com, who is attending his fifth CES. German believes more tech companies are choosing to launch products at other times of the year when they don’t have to compete for attention.

Survey: Mobile Phones Set to Dominate Web Access

December 16, 2008

According to technology experts surveyed by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, mobile phones are destined to become the standard way of connecting to the Internet by 2020.

From Network World:

By 2020, mobile phones will be the primary Internet devices for most people in the world, according to a panel of experts.

“The mobile phone – now with significant computing power – [will be] the primary Internet connection and the only one for a majority of the people across the world,” the Pew Internet & American Life Project writes in a new “Future of the Internet” report. “Telephony [will be] offered under a set of universal standards and protocols accepted by most operators internationally, making for reasonably effortless movement from one part of the world to another.”

Client ACCESS has helped to develop and deliver technologies that have brought the Internet to a new generation of mobile devices and consumers. ACCESS technologies were central to the development of the first successful mobile data service in the world and this success has grown at a phenomenal pace with ACCESS technologies now deployed in millions of devices around the world.

Principal ACCESS technologies include the Garnet OS, ACCESS Linux Platform, NetFront Mobile Client Suite and NetFront Browser.

If you’re going to be at CES International 2009, be sure to stop by Digital Hollywood where both Albert Chu and Larry Berkin of ACCESS will be presenting. Hear their thoughts on the future of the mobile and beyond-PC markets, the next generation home digital experience, the open internet generation and how new technologies will affect the consumer in today’s era of convergence.

Victor Harwood always puts on a great show so make sure to attend the following panels:

Thursday, January 8

10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Track III- ME6- Mobile Entertainment Track

Reinventing the Mobile Device and Mobile Network- Integrating the Full PC Experience into a Personal Communications Device

Albert Chu, VP of Marketing & Alliances, ACCESS Systems America

Daren Gill, VP/GM vtap, Veveo

Warren Tomlin, President and Chief Creative Officer, Fuel Industries

Keith Saft, Global Director, Mobile User Experience, Yahoo!

Anup Muraka, Director of Technical Marketing, Mobile & Devices, Adobe

Steve Andler, VP of Marketing, Networks in Motion

Peg Jackson, Managing Director, Neocarta Ventures, Moderator


For Session Description & Speaker Bios Click Here

Thursday, January 8

Noon to 1 p.m.

Track III- ME7, Mobile Entertainment Track

The Mobile Web: The Future of Applications, Commerce, GPS, Communications and Content

Larry Berkin, VP, Ecosystem and Corporate Business Development, ACCESS Systems America

Mikael Nerde, Sony Ericsson

Noel Chandler, CEO and Co-Founder, Mosio

Bill Stone, Chief Executive Officer, Handango

Michael Weaver, VP, Strategy, Crisp Wireless

Jeff Litvack, GM, Mobile and Emerging Products, Associated Press

Pete Flint, Founder and CEO, Trulia

David Berkowitz, Director, Emerging Media, 360i, Moderator


For Session Description & Speaker Bios Click Here

The Top Media & Marketing Innovations of 2008

December 16, 2008

Adweek has called out Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to open the social network platform to developers who wanted to create applications for users as a top media and marketing innovation of 2008. The magazine notes Facebook’s move had ripple effects, influencing Steve Jobs to open the Apple iPhone to developers and MySpace to open its network to third-party applications.

From AdWeek:

Zuckerberg’s Most Popular

Facebook may not, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg awkwardly proclaimed when announcing its ad strategy over a year ago, have changed the face of media, but it most certainly has changed the development of a medium. Its move in May of last year to open the social-networking service to outside developers proved remarkably farsighted and influential. Its platform spread like a virus in 2008. As MySpace quarreled with widget makers about building business off its audience, Facebook embraced the outside help. The rationale was simple but revolutionary: The surest way to build out services is to have an outside army of developers do it. To date, 400,000 developers have introduced some 52,000 apps-and Facebook, not coincidentally, has exploded, expanding its user base to 130 million worldwide. That not only led MySpace to embrace outside developers but also paved the way for Apple to open the iPhone platform. The result: Everyone has found platform religion. David Verklin, head of the cable TV consortium Project Canoe, even talks of the boob tube as a platform. When the book is written on Facebook — and many are in the works — its critical choice to open up to outsiders may be seen as its most lasting contribution to the development of digital media.

iPhone Juices Mobile Medium
Apple’s iPhone 3G may not singlehandedly push mobile advertising to seriously-big-bucks, steady-line-on-the-flowchart status in 2009 — the sorry economy will most likely keep that from happening. And the trendy device won’t have the U.S. suddenly turning into South Korea, where 90 percent of the population dumps their PCs and starts watching movies and playing games on their mobiles. But in 2008, the iPhone phenomenon did create a shift in the mindset of the American consumer — from “Why would I want to surf the Web on my crappy phone?” to “I can do that? I want one now!” Thus, the touch screen has become the default design choice among models ranging from Google’s G1 and Samsung’s Instinct to the BlackBerry Storm (which, upon its debut last month, managed to create lines outside retail outlets reminiscent of those for the latest iPhone this past July). Then there are the many iPhone games and applications that have launched — everything from a New York Times app to the Social Gaming Network’s iBowl. It’s now clear that the mobile medium is going to get there, and that advertisers are going to have a real canvas to play on in the near future, one that goes beyond short-code messages and clunky WAP sites. For that, they can thank Steve Jobs.

All A-Twitter
It’s easy to make fun of Twitter. The short-messaging service’s simple concept — roadcast what you’re doing right now — has become synonymous with banal updates like your friend is “eating a taco.” To be sure, plenty of taco-eating bulletins are broadcast daily by the six million registered users of the two-and-a-half-year-old service. But the surging popularity of Twitter points to a social-networking truth: Our conceptions of one another — and brands — are often formed by bite-sized interactions. A single update does not in itself mean much — but taken with hundreds, even thousands of them, those little messages can come together to paint a rich portrait. What’s more, Twitter nailed something that’s fundamental to the Web: Keep it simple. Frustrating to some for its lack of bells and whistles, Twitter’s simple “What are you doing?” query and 140-character message limit are arguably its strengths. Twitter also proved that the most successful Web applications are flexible and open. Twitter’s designers never envisioned that consumers would use the service to communicate with one another, but users refashioned it as such, employing the prefix “@+user name” to direct replies. So, Twitter rejiggered to support that back-and-forth, while also letting outside developers build apps, further bolstering Twitter’s popularity. “Tweeting” may not be for everyone, but it’s clearly onto something: The 25-person company recently turned down a $500 million acquisition offer from Facebook.

Can Millennials Change the Way We Work?

December 16, 2008

How much the social-network-loving millennial generation will change the workplace has yet to be seen, but blogger Tom Davenport has seen evidence that they will try. He points readers to a recent Wall Street Journal article which quotes a teen blogger named Olivia, stating: “We are hard working and utilize tools to get the job done. But we don’t want to work more than 40 hours a week, and we want to wear clothes that are comfortable. We want to be able to spice up the dull workday by listening to our iPods. If corporate America doesn’t like that, too bad.”

I’ve included portions of both the blog by Tom Davenport and the Wall Street Journal article below. Interesting reading.

From Harvard Business Publishing:

I wrote a post a few weeks back about whether the current economic climate might lead to a somewhat reduced focus on twittering and friending a la Web 2.0. I thought my comments were fairly mild, but apparently not in the view of many commenters. I haven’t been accused so vehemently of not understanding the younger generation since I insisted that my teenaged sons go on vacation with the family.

Now I am fairly secure in my membership in Generation Jones–I still have lots of pleated pants, for example–and I find the accusations that “I just don’t get it” amusing. But the comments did make me think about the fate of the millennials as they move into the workforce. Will they bend to the whims of the workplace, or will the workplace bend to suit them?

Of course, we don’t know for sure which sort of bending will eventually win out. But there are some fun clues from two different settings. One is the award-winning AMC hit series “Mad Men,” in which the work and lives of 1960’s advertisers are fictionalized. I’m watching the second season now on my DVR; the first season is available on DVD. The ad agency chronicled in the series, Sterling Cooper, has decided that it needs to “think young,” and has hired some youthful employees to represent their generation to clients. One of them, Smitty, has lines like, “Our generation doesn’t want to be told what to do or how to act. We just want to BE,” and “Stop telling my generation what to do, man. We want to find things for ourselves, dig? We want to feel.” His actual achievements are somewhat less radical; he comes up with a new ditty to sell coffee, for example. Of course, we don’t know whether Smitty eventually sells out, but the fact that he works in an advertising agency suggests that the chances of his revolutionizing the workplace are slim.

Wall Street Journal columnist Ron Alsop’s recent article in the WSJ , “The Trophy Kids Go to Work,” includes quotes from millennials that are reminiscent of Smitty’s. The article, derived from Alsop’s new book, describes some of the work-related attitudes of the generation that got trophies for just showing up at soccer.

Now I dislike these generational generalizations, but Alsop has come up with some interesting observations. I loved this quote, for example, from Olivia, a teenage blogger: “They are finding that they have to adjust work around our lives instead of us adjusting our lives around work…What other option do they have? We are hard working and utilize tools to get the job done. But we don’t want to work more than 40 hours a week, and we want to wear clothes that are comfortable. We want to be able to spice up the dull workday by listening to our iPods. If corporate America doesn’t like that, too bad.”

From the Wall Street Journal:

Although members of other generations were considered somewhat spoiled in their youth, millennials feel an unusually strong sense of entitlement. Older adults criticize the high-maintenance rookies for demanding too much too soon. “They want to be CEO tomorrow,” is a common refrain from corporate recruiters.

More than 85% of hiring managers and human-resource executives said they feel that millennials have a stronger sense of entitlement than older workers, according to a survey by CareerBuilder.com. The generation’s greatest expectations: higher pay (74% of respondents); flexible work schedules (61%); a promotion within a year (56%); and more vacation or personal time (50%).

“They really do seem to want everything, and I can’t decide if it’s an inability or an unwillingness to make trade-offs,” says Derrick Bolton, assistant dean and M.B.A. admissions director at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. “They want to be CEO, for example, but they say they don’t want to give up time with their families.”

Millennials, of course, will have to temper their expectations as they seek employment during this deep economic slump. But their sense of entitlement is an ingrained trait that will likely resurface in a stronger job market. Some research studies indicate that the millennial generation’s great expectations stem from feelings of superiority. Michigan State University’s Collegiate Employment Research Institute and MonsterTrak, an online careers site, conducted a research study of 18- to 28-year-olds and found that nearly half had moderate to high superiority beliefs about themselves. The superiority factor was measured by responses to such statements as “I deserve favors from others” and “I know that I have more natural talents than most.”

For their part, millennials believe they can afford to be picky, with talent shortages looming as baby boomers retire. “They are finding that they have to adjust work around our lives instead of us adjusting our lives around work,” a teenage blogger named Olivia writes on the Web site Xanga.com. “What other option do they have? We are hard working and utilize tools to get the job done. But we don’t want to work more than 40 hours a week, and we want to wear clothes that are comfortable. We want to be able to spice up the dull workday by listening to our iPods. If corporate America doesn’t like that, too bad.”

Where do such feelings come from? Blame it on doting parents, teachers and coaches. Millennials are truly “trophy kids,” the pride and joy of their parents. The millennials were lavishly praised and often received trophies when they excelled, and sometimes when they didn’t, to avoid damaging their self-esteem. They and their parents have placed a high premium on success, filling résumés with not only academic accolades but also sports and other extracurricular activities.

Wal-Mart to Sell iPhones?

December 8, 2008

In a move that analysts say hints at Apple’s mulling whether to offer a lower-priced, lighter-featured iPhone, the company will reportedly sell the devices in an undetermined number of Wal-Mart outlets starting this month.

From Bloomberg:

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. will become the second mass-market retail chain to start selling Apple Inc.’s iPhone, with two store representatives saying the world’s largest retailer will carry two models of the Web-surfing handset this month.

Employees in the cell-phone departments at five California stores, contacted by phone today, said Wal-Mart will offer iPhones by the end of December. Employees are currently being trained on how to sell the device, all five said.

Apple Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs tapped Best Buy Co., the largest U.S. electronics retailer, in September to sell the device as he works to win more buyers. Before then, the iPhone had been sold only by Apple and AT&T Inc., the exclusive provider of wireless service for the phone in the U.S.

Analysts say Apple may offer a discontinued 4-gigabyte version through Bentonville, Arkansas-based Wal-Mart and sell it for $99. Apple currently sells two models at $199 and $299.

“A $99, Apple-branded cell phone is inevitable,” said Shaw Wu, an analyst for Kaufman Brothers in San Francisco. “One of the key things Apple needs to do to drive broader iPhone adoption is to build a more complete product line” with low- end, mid-range and high-end products, Wu said in a Dec. 5 note.

Apple spokesman Steve Dowling wouldn’t respond to the report and said the company “does not comment on rumor or speculation.” Wal-Mart spokesman Dan Fogleman said the company hasn’t made an official announcement on an iPhone offering and has no comment. AT&T spokesman Mark Siegel declined to comment.