Posted tagged ‘Hulu’

Rumor: Apple May Buy Hulu

July 22, 2011

If rumors are true, it appears that Apple could be considering a purchase of popular online video service Hulu.

From CNN:

The Hulu rumor mill was already heating up over the past few days — we reported about a bidding war for Hulu, which is shopping itself around to potential acquirers after deciding not to go through with a $2 billion IPO.

Sweetening the deal is a promise of five years of programming for Hulu’s highest bidder, including two years of exclusivity for the programming on Hulu, consisting of content from the Walt Disney Company, News Corp. and Comcast’s NBC Universal.

While Microsoft is reportedly not interested in a second round of bidding for the online video company, Yahoo is still in play.

Brittany Murphy Spoof From Saturday Night Live Pulled

December 21, 2009

A sketch from Saturday Night Live which satirized Brittany Murphy has been pulled from Internet sites such as hulu.com.

I’m sure that the video will soon not be available on YouTube but you can watch it (for now) below and judge for yourself if it should be removed due to the actress’ death yesterday.

From the New York Times:

In a segment that appeared on the Dec. 5 episode of “Saturday Night Live,” Seth Meyers, the show’s Weekend Update anchor and head writer, noted reports that Ms. Murphy had recently been fired from a film project called “The Collar.” He was soon joined at the Weekend Update desk by his cast mate Abby Elliott, who was impersonating Ms. Murphy. The fictional Ms. Murphy seemed to be disoriented and still under the impression she was on an episode that the real-life actress had hosted in 2002. (“You are not the host,” Mr. Meyers told Ms. Elliott throughout the skit.)

Though video of that sketch was posted to hulu.com soon after the show was broadcast, following Ms. Murphy’s death on Sunday, it has since disappeared from the site. A message on hulu.com reads, “Unfortunately this video is no longer available but here are other related videos to watch.” (Bootlegs of the skit have turned up on other blogs.) A press representative for “Saturday Night Live” did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

YouTube Signs Content Deal

April 16, 2009

According to multiple sources, Google’s YouTube video-sharing site has signed content deals with several Hollywood studios.

Looks like they’re going after Hulu!

From the Associated Press:

YouTube says it is partnering with major studios to stream full-length movies and TV shows on its site for free.

The Web site owned by Google Inc. says it is partnering on the initiative with Sony Pictures, CBS, MGM, Lionsgate, Starz and the BBC.

Advertising revenue will be shared with the content providers.

From Reuters:

The two sources said on condition of anonymity that the studio deal involved Sony Corp and other parties.

The move underscores Google’s efforts to ramp up content on YouTube to attract more advertising dollars.

On a blog post, YouTube said only that it was announcing a new destination for TV shows and an improved page for movies, without elaborating.

It also represents a thawing in a chilly relationship between Youtube and Hollywood, which has criticized the site in the past for posting unauthorized content.

YouTube, which Google bought for $1.65 billion in 2006, is under pressure to start yielding a return in line with its huge popularity. More than 100 million users watch videos on the site every month, according to the most recent data from comScore, an Internet audience measurement firm.

The Top Media & Marketing Innovations of 2008

December 16, 2008

Adweek has called out Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to open the social network platform to developers who wanted to create applications for users as a top media and marketing innovation of 2008. The magazine notes Facebook’s move had ripple effects, influencing Steve Jobs to open the Apple iPhone to developers and MySpace to open its network to third-party applications.

From AdWeek:

Zuckerberg’s Most Popular

Facebook may not, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg awkwardly proclaimed when announcing its ad strategy over a year ago, have changed the face of media, but it most certainly has changed the development of a medium. Its move in May of last year to open the social-networking service to outside developers proved remarkably farsighted and influential. Its platform spread like a virus in 2008. As MySpace quarreled with widget makers about building business off its audience, Facebook embraced the outside help. The rationale was simple but revolutionary: The surest way to build out services is to have an outside army of developers do it. To date, 400,000 developers have introduced some 52,000 apps-and Facebook, not coincidentally, has exploded, expanding its user base to 130 million worldwide. That not only led MySpace to embrace outside developers but also paved the way for Apple to open the iPhone platform. The result: Everyone has found platform religion. David Verklin, head of the cable TV consortium Project Canoe, even talks of the boob tube as a platform. When the book is written on Facebook — and many are in the works — its critical choice to open up to outsiders may be seen as its most lasting contribution to the development of digital media.

iPhone Juices Mobile Medium
Apple’s iPhone 3G may not singlehandedly push mobile advertising to seriously-big-bucks, steady-line-on-the-flowchart status in 2009 — the sorry economy will most likely keep that from happening. And the trendy device won’t have the U.S. suddenly turning into South Korea, where 90 percent of the population dumps their PCs and starts watching movies and playing games on their mobiles. But in 2008, the iPhone phenomenon did create a shift in the mindset of the American consumer — from “Why would I want to surf the Web on my crappy phone?” to “I can do that? I want one now!” Thus, the touch screen has become the default design choice among models ranging from Google’s G1 and Samsung’s Instinct to the BlackBerry Storm (which, upon its debut last month, managed to create lines outside retail outlets reminiscent of those for the latest iPhone this past July). Then there are the many iPhone games and applications that have launched — everything from a New York Times app to the Social Gaming Network’s iBowl. It’s now clear that the mobile medium is going to get there, and that advertisers are going to have a real canvas to play on in the near future, one that goes beyond short-code messages and clunky WAP sites. For that, they can thank Steve Jobs.

All A-Twitter
It’s easy to make fun of Twitter. The short-messaging service’s simple concept — roadcast what you’re doing right now — has become synonymous with banal updates like your friend is “eating a taco.” To be sure, plenty of taco-eating bulletins are broadcast daily by the six million registered users of the two-and-a-half-year-old service. But the surging popularity of Twitter points to a social-networking truth: Our conceptions of one another — and brands — are often formed by bite-sized interactions. A single update does not in itself mean much — but taken with hundreds, even thousands of them, those little messages can come together to paint a rich portrait. What’s more, Twitter nailed something that’s fundamental to the Web: Keep it simple. Frustrating to some for its lack of bells and whistles, Twitter’s simple “What are you doing?” query and 140-character message limit are arguably its strengths. Twitter also proved that the most successful Web applications are flexible and open. Twitter’s designers never envisioned that consumers would use the service to communicate with one another, but users refashioned it as such, employing the prefix “@+user name” to direct replies. So, Twitter rejiggered to support that back-and-forth, while also letting outside developers build apps, further bolstering Twitter’s popularity. “Tweeting” may not be for everyone, but it’s clearly onto something: The 25-person company recently turned down a $500 million acquisition offer from Facebook.