Posted tagged ‘Convention’

Daily Show Turns Politicians Into Famous Cartoon Characters Foghorn Leghorn and Droopy Dog

September 6, 2008

So is Fred Thompson really Foghorn Leghorn and Joe Lieberman really Droopy Dog? The answer is yes, according to Jon Stewart at the Daily Show. Well, at least they have amazing similarities.

Whether you’re a Republican, a Democrat or an independent, you have to admit that there is a striking resemblance in both looks and voices.

*If the video does not work, it means that someone has taken it down due to copyright rules.

From Animation Magazine:

There’s nothing novel about comparing American politics to a cartoon, but one late-night TV comedian got big laughs by pointing out that some of our leading politicians are becoming real-life versions of classic cartoon characters. The point was illuminated following Tuesday night’s broadcast of the Republican Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota.

During Wednesday night’s broadcast of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, host Jon Stewart noted the similarities between two Republican Convention speakers and a pair of iconic animated characters. Republican Senator Fred Thompson, with his puffed-up bravado and folksy Southern Drawl, was likened to boisterous Looney Tunes favorite Foghorn Leghorn, and jowly, slow-speaking former Al Gore running mate Joe Lieberman was compared to Tex Avery’s MGM creation, Droopy Dog.

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John McCain Vows to Bring Change to Washington

September 5, 2008

John McCain is preparing to give the biggest speech of his political career. With polls indicating a close race between McCain and Obama, the outcome will likely be decided in scattered swing states in the Midwest and the Southwest. McCain hopes to reach out to many of these voters tonight at the Republican National Convention with a speech which will discuss changes in Washington.

Reuters

Credit: Reuters

From the Associated Press:

John McCain, a POW turned political rebel, vowed Thursday night to vanquish the “constant partisan rancor” plaguing the nation as he launched his fall campaign for the White House. “Change is coming” to Washington, he promised the Republican National Convention.

“I will reach out my hand to anyone to help me get this country moving again,” McCain said in remarks prepared for the a prime time address. “I have that record and the scars to prove it. Senator Obama does not,” he said of his rival for the White House, Sen. Barack Obama.

McCain also invoked the five years he spent in a North Vietnamese prison. “I fell in love with my country when I was a prisoner in someone else’s,” he said. “I was never the same again. I wasn’t my own man anymore. I was my country’s.”

McCain’s speech was the highlight of the final night of the party convention, but before he took the podium, delegates unanimously awarded the vice presidential nomination to Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. She is the first female ticketmate in Republican history.

McCain, 72 and campaigning to become the oldest first-term president in history, faced a delicate assignment as he formally accepted his party’s presidential nomination: presenting his credentials as a reformer willing to take on his own party and stressing his independence from an unpopular President Bush.

He and Palin were departing their convention city immediately after the Arizona senator‘s acceptance speech, bound for Wisconsin and an early start on the final weeks of the White House campaign.

Palin has been the object of intense scrutiny since McCain tapped her as his running mate last week. “I’m very proud to have introduced our next vice president to the country,” he said. “But I can’t wait until I introduce her to Washington.”

The last night of the McCain-Palin convention also marked the end of an intensive stretch of politics with the potential to reshape the race. Democrats held their own convention last week in Denver, nominating Delaware Sen. Joseph Biden as running mate for Obama, whose own acceptance speech drew an estimated 84,000 partisans to an outdoor football stadium.

Sarah Palin’s Speech Shows Confidence, Takes Shots at Barack Obama

September 4, 2008

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin told delegates at the Republican National Convention last night that she’s an outsider ready to join John McCain in helping to bring “real” change to Washington.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Sarah Palin accepted her party’s nomination for the vice presidency last night to the boisterous excitement of gathered Republicans, employing oratorical sparkle to argue for her qualifications as a reform candidate and her “servant’s heart,” slam the record of Barack Obama, and lionize running mate John McCain.

Mr. McCain, she argued, is an “upright and honorable man, the kind of fellow whose name you will find on war memorials in small towns across this great country, only he was among those who came home.” And she called him a wise and compassionate man who has “seen evil,” knows how to confront it, and is fit for “the most powerful office on earth.” “There is only one man in this election who has ever really fought for you in places where winning means survival and defeat means death,” she said, “and that man is John McCain.”

Reviews of the speech were generally strong. The Washington Post said Gov. Palin “proved to be an instant jolt of energy for a political party that has been worried and demoralized for much of 2008,” while the New York Times said she “electrified a convention that has been consumed by questions of whether she was up to the job.” The Wall Street Journal notes she was trying “to take all the problems and controversies that have arisen since her nomination” and “turn them into assets with mainstream voters,” and that this “went down well with the party stalwarts” at the convention, repeatedly drawing sustained applause, supportive chants and boos for those she villainized.

But “the broader question was how her speech would play to the audience beyond,” the Journal says, “a question that was impossible to answer immediately.” Following the convention, the Times adds, Gov. Palin “moves into a national campaign where she will have to appeal to audiences that are not necessarily primed to adore her” and “navigate far less controlled campaign settings that will test not only her political skills but also her knowledge of foreign and domestic policy.” Still, Roll Call dubbed her speech “the marquee event” of the convention, and its success raised the bar for the speech of Mr. McCain set for tonight.

The Associated Press has the full text of the speech. It was a big night for Palin and she delivered a speech which took direct shots at Barack Obama and his campaign. It will be interesting to see how the polls react following both national conventions and the entire Bristol Palin/Levi Johnston pregnancy. Thoughts?

The Republicans Strike Back…

September 3, 2008

No, Darth Vader did not appear, lightsaber in hand. But Fred Thompson did take Vader-like control of the evening with a rousing speech criticizing the inexperience of Barack Obama.

Republicans, led by Thompson, assailed Barack Obama as the most liberal, least experienced White House nominee in history this evening and President Bush led the praise for GOP candidate John McCain. Republican delegates rallied behind vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin in the face of fresh controversy.

Jim Young, Reuters

Credit: Jim Young, Reuters

From USA Today:

Eight years after he accepted the vice presidential nomination at the Democratic convention, Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman, the featured speaker Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention, made the case for Republican candidate John McCain.

AP Photo/Ron Edmonds

Credit: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds

“I’m here to support John McCain because country matters more than party,” Lieberman said. “I am here tonight for a simple reason, because John McCain’s whole life testifies to a great truth: being a Democrat or a Republican is important. But it is nowhere near as important as being an American.”

From the New York Times:

If John McCain wants voters to conclude, as he argues, that he has more independence and experience and better judgment than Barack Obama, he made a bad start by choosing Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska.

Mr. McCain’s supporters are valiantly trying to argue that the selection was a bold stroke that shows their candidate is a risk-taking maverick who — we can believe — will change Washington. (Mr. Obama’s call for change — now “the change we need” — has become all the rage in St. Paul.)

To us, it says the opposite. Mr. McCain’s snap choice of Ms. Palin reflects his impulsive streak: a wild play that he made after conservative activists warned him that he would face an all-out revolt in the party if he chose who he really wanted — Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Former Republican presidential candidate Fred Thompson defended John McCain’s running mate, Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as a victim of left-wing media attacks who fear what she represents. The crowd went wild.

“What a breath of fresh air Gov. Sarah Palin is,” Thompson told the cheering delegates tonight. “She’s from a small town with small town values. Well, apparently that’s not good enough for folks that are out there attacking her and her family.”

Thompson by Emmanuel Dunand, AFP/Getty Images; Lieberman by Susan Walsh, AP

Credit: Thompson by Emmanuel Dunand, AFP/Getty Images; Lieberman by Susan Walsh, AP

Palin disclosed Monday that her unmarried 17-year-old daughter is pregnant and will marry the father. She’s been under intense media scrutiny in recent days for a variety of reasons, including an investigation over whether she abused her office to try and fire her former brother-in-law and her history of securing earmarks for her state. McCain regularly touts his opposition to earmarks on the campaign trail.

Thompson blamed “media big shots” who attack her because she doesn’t “talk a good game” on Sunday talk shows and “hit the Washington cocktail party circuit.”

Palin has “got the other side and their friends in the media in a state of panic,” Thompson said, touting the one credential she brings to the Republican ticket that no one else can claim. Well, besides being a woman. “She’s the only candidate who knows how to field-dress a moose,” he quipped.

AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall

Credit: AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall

From the Associated Press:

“God only made one John McCain, and he is his own man,” declared Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the 2000 Democratic presidential nominee, awarded a prime-time turn at the Republicans’ convention podium.

Obama drew criticism when Lieberman said the Democratic presidential candidate voted to cut off funding “for our troops on the ground” in Iraq last year.

And again when former Sen. Fred Thompson scoffed at the 47-year-old Illinois senator, who is seeking to become the first black president.

“Democrats present a history-making nominee for president. History making in that he is the most liberal, most inexperienced nominee ever to run for president,” Thompson said as delegates roared their agreement.

Levi Johnston To Attend Republican National Convention

September 3, 2008

The Associated Press is reporting that the boyfriend of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s unwed, pregnant daughter will be on hand  at the GOP convention in St. Paul, Minnesota this week.

Levi Johnston

Levi Johnston

From the article:

Levi Johnston’s mother said her 18-year-old son left Alaska on Tuesday morning to join the Palin family at the convention where Sen. John McCain will officially receive the Republican nomination for president. The boy’s mother, Sherry Johnston, said there had been no pressure put on her son to marry 17-year-old Bristol Palin and the two teens had made plans to wed before it was known she was pregnant.

“This is just a bonus,” Johnston said.

The young man’s presence could set off a media frenzy around the young couple as photographers and cameramen scramble for pictures of the two teenagers. On Monday, Palin and her husband, Todd, said their 17-year-old daughter, Bristol, planned to have the baby and wed a young man identified only as Levi. The family asked the media to respect the young couple’s privacy as has been the tradition with children of candidates.

Sarah Palin is scheduled to address the convention Wednesday night and traditionally her family would join her at the conclusion of her speech.

Sherry Johnston said she was worried about her son dealing with all the attention. She said it was difficult enough for teenagers to deal with any pregnancy, having the entire nation watching made it worse.

It should be very interesting to see how this entire issue plays out. Barack Obama has come out stating that “families are off limits” and we’ll see how long that holds up. Thoughts?

Republican Convention Suspends Activities

September 1, 2008

With Hurricane Gustav quickly approaching New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, Senator John McCain announced that Republican Party activities on Monday in St. Paul, Minnesota, would be suspended except for necessary business. He called on his party members to “take off our Republican hats and put on out American hats.”

From the New York Times:

Mr. McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee, delivered a statement via video at a news conference here in which Republican officials announced they would hold only essential party business required under its rules on Monday. They also pledged to refrain from the kind of political rhetoric that traditionally opens conventions and said they would mobilize corporations who have contributed millions of dollars to put on the convention, as well as the campaign’s top fund-raisers, to raise money for relief efforts.

“This is a time when we have to do away with our party politics and we have to act as Americans,” Mr. McCain said, appearing from St. Louis, where he was campaigning with Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, his running mate.

Amid extraordinary circumstances that remain extremely uncertain, many questions remain unanswered, including whether Mr. McCain and Mrs. Palin will actually appear at the convention here to accept their party’s nominations and what the schedule might look like for the rest of what had been expected to be a four-day political coronation for Mr. McCain and his vice presidential nominee.

Rick Davis, the McCain-Palin campaign manager, said organizers are proceeding on a day-by-day basis, monitoring the course of the storm and its damage.

For now, he said, party officials have decided that Monday’s session will open at 3 p.m. Central time and probably end at 5 to 5:30 p.m. and will be limited to official business like adopting the platform and electing convention officers. President Bush, who had been slated to speak on Monday night, said Sunday that he would not appear at the convention, and White House officials said Vice President Dick Cheney would not appear as well.

Hillary Clinton’s Speech Earns Wide Praise Across the Country

August 27, 2008

US News & World Report has an great summary of the reviews of Hillary Clinton’s speech last night at the Democratic National Convention. I was not able to watch her speech live but was able to catch a replay on CNN late last night.

From the article:

Hillary Clinton last night addressed the Democratic delegates gathered in Denver, and urged them to back her former rival Barack Obama. The speech, and Clinton’s delivery of it, are receiving extremely positive reviews in today’s newspapers. On its front page, the Los Angeles Times reports Clinton accepted “defeat with grace and generosity,” and “moved to close the divide among fellow Democrats on Tuesday night by offering a forceful and unequivocal endorsement of her fierce rival.” The New York Times reports Clinton “deferred her own dreams on Tuesday night and delivered an emphatic plea at the Democratic National Convention to unite behind her rival, Senator Barack Obama, no matter what ill will lingers.” The New York senator “betrayed none of the anger and disappointment that she still feels and that, friends say, has especially haunted her husband.” The Washington Times refers to a “rousing speech” that laid “rest to a bitter primary battle that left many of her supporters — especially women — seething months later.” The APWashington Post reports Clinton said, “You haven’t worked so hard over the last 18 months, or endured the last eight years, to suffer through more failed leadership. No way. No how. No McCain. Barack Obama is my candidate. And he must be our president.” reports “the speech was as much of an attack “on Sen. John McCain “as it was an embrace of Obama.”

The Rocky Mountain News says Clinton “did her best to put the hard feelings to rest.”

On ABC World News, which aired prior to the speech, ABC’s chief Washington correspondent George Stephanopoulos contended that Sen. Clinton “genuinely believes that if John McCain wins it will be bad for the country. She knows that. She wants Barack Obama to win, whatever disappointment she feels. Whatever anger she feels about Barack Obama. And that’s real, too.”

Nature Of Roll Call Vote Still Undetermined Despite the effort to forge unity, a number of issues still remain to be resolved. USA Today notes that while Clinton “urged her supporters to fall in line behind the presumptive Democratic nominee,” her backers “and Obama’s are still negotiating the fine details of Wednesday night’s roll call vote for nominating the Democratic presidential candidate.” The AP notes Clinton “did not indicate whether she would have her name placed in nomination or seek a formal roll call of the states when the party’s top prize is awarded by delegates on Wednesday night.”

The Democratic Party appears to be a little concerned over recent polls showing John McCain catching, and passing Democratic nominee Barack Obama.

Fox News reported, “If Barack Obama gets the traditional post-convention bounce in the polls it can’t come soon enough.” Obama “has led John McCain in the head to head surveys most of the summer but things at the moment appear to be changing.” The Gallup daily presidential tracking poll shows McCain creeping ahead of Obama 46%-44%. The race had been tied at 45% for the previous two days. The poll surveyed 2,684 registered voters from August 23-25. The Rasmussen Reports automated daily presidential tracking poll of 3,000 likely voters for August 26 shows Barack Obama and John McCain tied at 44%, and at 46%-46% including leaners. The New York Post reports that Obama “got exactly zero bounce” from his selection of Sen. Joe Biden.

The Washington Post reports on its front page that “top elected officials continued to raise questions about Obama’s campaign strategy and worried aloud that he must do more to overcome the doubts voters in their states have about his readiness to be president.” The Post adds that Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell “said that Obama is still struggling to connect with working-class voters and that the presumptive nominee reminded him of Adlai Stevenson, the brainy Illinoisan who lost the presidential campaigns of 1952 and 1956.” Sen. Chuck Schumer “said Obama’s campaign must demonstrate its willingness to engage against a Republican Party that he said is well skilled in political combat.” Both were prominent supporters of Clinton in the primary.

With only 10 weeks to go, this race is going to come down to the wire. I’m very interested in listening to Barack Obama’s acceptance speech on Thursday. Thoughts?