Posted tagged ‘Chicago Tribune’

Brian Urlacher Done for Season

September 14, 2009

A devastating blow to the Chicago Bears who may have lost LB Brian Urlacher for the season last night after suffering a dislocated wrist against the rival Green Bay Packers.

From ESPN:

The six-time Pro Bowler had told the Chicago Tribune in a brief text message early Monday that his season was over.

Urlacher left Sunday’s 21-15 loss to the Green Bay Packers with a wrist injury in the third quarter.

Bears coach Lovie Smith said Urlacher dislocated his wrist, and no timetable had been set for his return.

Citing unnamed sources, the Tribune reported on Sunday night that Urlacher will have surgery when the team returns to Chicago. The newspaper reported that Urlacher had an X-ray at halftime, but an MRI was not needed.

From USA Today:

Urlacher told the Chicago Tribune that his “season is over” in a text message.

Bears coach Lovie Smith will meet reporters later in the day.

Urlacher, a 10-year veteran, was expected to have surgery on Monday. He left Sunday’s game after injuring his wrist on a tackle in the second quarter.

Advertisements

Chicago Sun-Times Files For Chapter 11

March 31, 2009

The Sun-Times Media Group, which publishes the Chicago Sun-Times newspaper, said this morning that it had filed for bankruptcy protection.

From Dow Jones:

Sun-Times Media Group Inc. (SUTM) has filed for bankruptcy protection, the latest casualty of an extended advertising slump that is reshaping the newspaper industry.

It joins other media companies such as Tribune Co. (TRBCQ), the Chicago-based publisher of the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, which filed under Chapter 11 late last year after it was unable to cover interest on bank debt it picked up as part of Sam Zell’s takeover of the company.

The newspaper industry has seen bankruptcy filings, asset sales, layoffs and other cost-cutting moves this year as the economic downturn worsened already-declining ad sales. The ad slump has deepened since late last year, spreading to television broadcasters and Internet media sites.

Sun-Times Media operates 59 newspapers and related Web sites, including the Chicago Sun-Times.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer Goes Web Only

March 16, 2009

It was announced today that the Seattle Post-Intelligencer will print its final edition Tuesday.

From the Associated Press:

Hearst Corp., which owns the 146-year-old P-I, said Monday that it failed to find a buyer for the newspaper, which it put up for a 60-day sale in January after years of losing money. Now the P-I will shift entirely to the Web.

“Tonight will be the final run, so let’s do it right,” publisher Roger Oglesby told the newsroom.

Hearst’s decision to abandon the print product in favor of an Internet-only version is the first for a large American newspaper, raising questions about whether the company can make money in a medium where others have come up short.

David Lonay, 80, a subscriber since 1950, said he’ll miss a morning ritual that can’t be replaced by a Web-only version.

“The first thing I do every day is get the P-I and read it,” Lonay said. “I really feel like an old friend is dying.”

Hearst’s move to end the print edition leaves the P-I’s larger rival, The Seattle Times, as the only mainstream daily in the city.

“It’s a really sad day for Seattle,” said P-I reporter Angela Galloway. “The P-I has its strengths and weaknesses but it always strove for a noble cause, which was to give voice to those without power and scrutiny of those with power.”

Seattle follows Denver in losing a daily newspaper this year. The Rocky Mountain News closed after its owner, E.W. Scripps Co., couldn’t find a buyer. In Arizona, Gannett Co.’s Tucson Citizen is set to close Saturday, leaving one newspaper in that city.

And last month Hearst said it would close or sell the San Francisco Chronicle if the newspaper couldn’t slash expenses in coming weeks.

The newspaper industry has seen ad revenue fall in recent years as advertisers migrate to the Internet, particularly to sites offering free or low-cost alternatives for classified ads. Starting last summer, the recession intensified the decline in advertising revenue in all categories.

Four newspaper companies, including the owners of the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and The Philadelphia Inquirer, have sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in recent months.

Blagojevich to Fill Obama’s Senate Seat With Roland Burris

December 30, 2008

Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich is expected to name former Illinois Attorney General Roland Burris to President-elect Barack Obama’s vacated Senate seat, according to a report by the Chicago Tribune.

From MSNBC:

The governor has scheduled a 3 p.m. ET news conference Tuesday, but his spokesman Lucio Guerrero declined to tell the Associated Press what the governor plans to discuss.

Blagojevich has been under pressure to step aside or resign since his arrest earlier this month on federal corruption charges. He’s accused of trying to sell Obama’s vacant U.S. Senate seat to the highest bidder.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has warned Blagojevich that Senate Democrats will not seat anyone the governor appoints. Lawmakers in Springfield are considering whether to proceed with plans to impeach him.

Tribune Co. Files for Bankruptcy

December 8, 2008

The Tribune Co., owner of the Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune and numerous other dailies, filed for bankruptcy today in what can be seen as the latest blow to a newspaper industry reeling from a drop in advertising and the rise of online media.

From the New York Times:

The move came less than a year after Samuel Zell, a Chicago real estate tycoon, took control of the Tribune chain and took on most of the $13 billion debt burden that now threatens to cripple it in the face of a sinking economy and a collapse in advertising.

Mr. Zell said the company had enough cash to continue operating its 12 newspapers, 23 television stations, national cable channel and assorted other media holdings, and the company insisted that the filing would have no effect on employees’ payroll and benefits, or on the vast majority of their retirement accounts.

But in light of its shrinking cash flow, Tribune decided to file for bankruptcy in a Delaware court, with the urging of some of its major creditors who met with Tribune representatives over the previous three days.

The recession and the shift of advertising to the Internet have hit newspapers with the sharpest drop in advertising revenue since the Depression — Tribune’s papers were down 19 percent in the third quarter — and some major newspapers have defaulted on debt or been put up for sale, with no takers. But Tribune’s problems were made significantly worse by the unusual $8.2 billion deal put together last year by Mr. Zell, which took the company private and nearly tripled its debt load, driving the company deeper into debt than any other major newspaper publisher.

The company has cut its staff and products, deeply and repeatedly, in an attempt to stay ahead of debt payments. In May, it also sold one of its most profitable newspapers, Newsday, to Cablevision for $650 million.

Tribune faces more than $900 million in interest payments over the next year, and a $512 million principal payment due in June.

Obama Wins! Declares New Mexico Sun

October 28, 2008

“Obama Wins!” is the headline of the latest edition of the New Mexico Sun on newsstands now, complete with “special collector’s edition” in red bold typeface. I haven’t yet read this article but saw the story on CNN today. I’m sure there is more behind this story than is being shown today on television as I’m sure a publication like the New Mexico Sun would not go ahead and print a story such as this if they did not have anything to back it up.

Getty Images

Credit: Getty Images

From CNN:

The Sun News is a bi-monthly newspaper and its Oct 26-Nov 8 issue had to hit the streets, and the newsstands, before the election. So the editors decided to make a leap of faith and declare Democrat Barack Obama the winner.

In an article explaining their choice, the editors unabashedly wrote, “When it comes to calling the winner of a presidential election, everyone wants to be first. The New Mexico Sun News hereby claims that achievement.”

In its tongue-in-cheek style, the article went on to note the newspaper has a goal of reaching one million readers with each edition, but prints just 10,000 copies of each of its issues.

So, “each copy must be read by 100 different and distinct people. This places an enormous burden on our intrepid readers. However, it is a burden that we must insist you carry. So, please, read quickly, care for the physical condition of the paper and pass it on to your next chosen reader.”

From the National Ledger:

Cancel the vote, it is over. The New Mexico Sun News has declared, Obama wins! Is this the newspaper John McCain will hold if he pulls off the big upset in what would be a modern day Dewey Beats Truman moment? Perhaps the paper will be a collector’s item as the Chicago Tribune was after their premature deceleration in the Dewey vs. Truman race.

Dewey Defeats Truman was a famously incorrect banner headline on the front page of the first edition of the Chicago Tribune on November 3, 1948. President Harry S. Truman, who had been expected to lose to Republican challenger Thomas E. Dewey in the 1948 presidential race, won the election, according to a Wiki entry.

Hillary Clinton’s Speech Earns Wide Praise Across the Country

August 27, 2008

US News & World Report has an great summary of the reviews of Hillary Clinton’s speech last night at the Democratic National Convention. I was not able to watch her speech live but was able to catch a replay on CNN late last night.

From the article:

Hillary Clinton last night addressed the Democratic delegates gathered in Denver, and urged them to back her former rival Barack Obama. The speech, and Clinton’s delivery of it, are receiving extremely positive reviews in today’s newspapers. On its front page, the Los Angeles Times reports Clinton accepted “defeat with grace and generosity,” and “moved to close the divide among fellow Democrats on Tuesday night by offering a forceful and unequivocal endorsement of her fierce rival.” The New York Times reports Clinton “deferred her own dreams on Tuesday night and delivered an emphatic plea at the Democratic National Convention to unite behind her rival, Senator Barack Obama, no matter what ill will lingers.” The New York senator “betrayed none of the anger and disappointment that she still feels and that, friends say, has especially haunted her husband.” The Washington Times refers to a “rousing speech” that laid “rest to a bitter primary battle that left many of her supporters — especially women — seething months later.” The APWashington Post reports Clinton said, “You haven’t worked so hard over the last 18 months, or endured the last eight years, to suffer through more failed leadership. No way. No how. No McCain. Barack Obama is my candidate. And he must be our president.” reports “the speech was as much of an attack “on Sen. John McCain “as it was an embrace of Obama.”

The Rocky Mountain News says Clinton “did her best to put the hard feelings to rest.”

On ABC World News, which aired prior to the speech, ABC’s chief Washington correspondent George Stephanopoulos contended that Sen. Clinton “genuinely believes that if John McCain wins it will be bad for the country. She knows that. She wants Barack Obama to win, whatever disappointment she feels. Whatever anger she feels about Barack Obama. And that’s real, too.”

Nature Of Roll Call Vote Still Undetermined Despite the effort to forge unity, a number of issues still remain to be resolved. USA Today notes that while Clinton “urged her supporters to fall in line behind the presumptive Democratic nominee,” her backers “and Obama’s are still negotiating the fine details of Wednesday night’s roll call vote for nominating the Democratic presidential candidate.” The AP notes Clinton “did not indicate whether she would have her name placed in nomination or seek a formal roll call of the states when the party’s top prize is awarded by delegates on Wednesday night.”

The Democratic Party appears to be a little concerned over recent polls showing John McCain catching, and passing Democratic nominee Barack Obama.

Fox News reported, “If Barack Obama gets the traditional post-convention bounce in the polls it can’t come soon enough.” Obama “has led John McCain in the head to head surveys most of the summer but things at the moment appear to be changing.” The Gallup daily presidential tracking poll shows McCain creeping ahead of Obama 46%-44%. The race had been tied at 45% for the previous two days. The poll surveyed 2,684 registered voters from August 23-25. The Rasmussen Reports automated daily presidential tracking poll of 3,000 likely voters for August 26 shows Barack Obama and John McCain tied at 44%, and at 46%-46% including leaners. The New York Post reports that Obama “got exactly zero bounce” from his selection of Sen. Joe Biden.

The Washington Post reports on its front page that “top elected officials continued to raise questions about Obama’s campaign strategy and worried aloud that he must do more to overcome the doubts voters in their states have about his readiness to be president.” The Post adds that Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell “said that Obama is still struggling to connect with working-class voters and that the presumptive nominee reminded him of Adlai Stevenson, the brainy Illinoisan who lost the presidential campaigns of 1952 and 1956.” Sen. Chuck Schumer “said Obama’s campaign must demonstrate its willingness to engage against a Republican Party that he said is well skilled in political combat.” Both were prominent supporters of Clinton in the primary.

With only 10 weeks to go, this race is going to come down to the wire. I’m very interested in listening to Barack Obama’s acceptance speech on Thursday. Thoughts?