Posted tagged ‘Blog’

Casey Anthony: Are We to Blame for the Not Guilty Verdict?

July 13, 2011

Very interesting piece on the website of the Orlando Sentinel today. I suggest clicking the link below for the full article.

It turns out that a consultant for the defense analyzed more than 40,000 highly-charged opinions, both negative and positive, that were found on social media sites and blogs, and used them to help the defense craft their trial strategy.

“A perfect example was Cindy Anthony. People hated her when she admitted to the chloroform searches, but there were many who said she lied out of motherly instinct. They felt a kinship, especially mothers. In closing, the defense softened its approach and said she lied to protect [Casey Anthony].”

From the Orlando Sentinel:

“When bloggers and others in social media sites started to attack George Anthony about his alleged mistress, the defense team beefed up their questions against him,” said Fort Lauderdale-based consultant Amy Singer. “None of the bloggers ever changed their minds about him.”

The innovative pro-bono tactic by Singer shows how social media sites like Facebook and Twitter could revolutionize the way lawyers defend their clients, especially in highly-publicized cases like the Casey Anthony murder trial.

“This is the first time I have heard of this kind of consulting for a trial and it’s incredible,” said Florida A&M University professor Shiv Persaud. “It definitely might become a part of my curriculum in trial practice. We could benefit from a new type of tool we didn’t have before.”

“I’ve spent 32 years listening to people’s reactions to trial stimulus, but it’s never been anything like this,” Singer said. “This whole case was driven by social media. We really tapped into people’s minds and I think it’s a tool that should be used by defense and prosecution.”

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We’ve Hit 1,000,000!!!!

April 15, 2011

1 million page views! How does that even happen?????

Thanks to everyone who comes by and reads this stuff. It amazes me how many people come here on a daily basis, read what I have to write and care enough to leave their thoughts/comments.

Really…I’m not that interesting 🙂

Here’s to reaching 2 million in 2012!

Thank You! 1,000,000 Times. Thank You!

April 14, 2011

As I’m writing this post, Kreuzer’s Korner currently stands at 999,450 page views. Absolutely amazing!

When I started the blog, I never thought I’d hit 1,000 or even 10,000. For some reason, after the first couple months, people started to stop by. The amount of readers seemed to grow daily.

Now, to be sitting 500 page views from 1 million? I’m speechless! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

I’m glad that everyone has found a place to come…to read…to have a discussion. For the most part…we’ve kept it clean 🙂

Whether it’s been Casey/Caylee Anthony, music, sports, politics, world news…I hope that I’ve been able to bring some information into your lives! Yeah…sometimes the stories aren’t earth shattering…but it’s been stuff that I’ve been interested in 🙂

So…here’s to the next 1 million page views!!!

How to Deal With “Trolls”

February 11, 2011

Trolls can be a websites worst enemy (or at least to some it can feel that way). But it’s relatively easy to keep the harm done by their incursions to a minimum.

You have to develop a thick skin, learn to distinguish overly passionate fans from genuine troublemakers and use positive reinforcement to reward more-productive members of your community.

“Keep in mind, trolls feed off your tasty community-manager tears,” Caroline Chen writes.

I’ve heard the term “troll” a lot recently…and a lot of people mention it surrounding the Casey Anthony case. Those who go from site to site causing trouble. I don’t mind having discussions. But let’s remember to keep it clean everyone, OK 😛

From ClickZ:

Don’t let them see you cry. Many a troll has kept a novice community manager up at night, tears brimming and soul wounded at the sight of caps-locked, multi-exclamation-pointed freak-outs. (“WHOEVER DID THIS CAMPAIGN SHOULD BE FIRED!!!!!!!!”) But keep in mind, trolls feed off your tasty community-manager tears. Thicken that skin, screen-grab, and collect in a folder (Desktop > Trollsville) to laugh at later. Seriously. Community management can be an emotional battlefield, and sometimes the best thing you can do is control your own sanity by not reacting.

Troll fights happen. Sometimes, you’ll be blessed with the spectacle of a troll fight. Trolls will try to out-negative one another in the same thread. Do allow this to happen. They only serve to illegitimize the trolls and make your job easier. They’re also highly entertaining.

Happy Valentine’s Day Everyone

February 14, 2009

Just wanted to thank each and everyone of you who stop by to read the blog each day.

Hope you all have a very happy Valentine’s Day! 🙂

Social Media Works…As Part of a Larger Campaign

February 6, 2009

Social Media Today asks the question: are we really missing the point about the strategies we create using these technologies?

It’s true, the number of followers you have on your Twitter account matters and the percentage of readers coming to your blog via an RSS reader are important.

But the real value of social media campaigns emerges when they’re connected to other elements of a broader communications and marketing campaign. Social media should be a component of the core campaign, and an important one.

From Social Media Today:

The other day in an article that’s gained a lot of attention, Guardian tech journalist Bobbie Johnson proclaimed that he’s done with social media. If you haven’t done so it’s definitely worth a read. In summary Bobbie says:

“I’ve had it with social media. Not social networking per se, but the incessant chatter about how “social media” is changing the world. How it’s going mainstream. How it’s the biggest change we’ve ever seen.”

So we have the incessant squawking of “experts”, and the talking up of the same people again and again and again as the ones everyone should ‘follow’ – something Kevin Palmer discusses in a great post entitled ‘The social media echo chamber makes me not want to listen.’

At its worst, it manifests itself in people pruning their friend lists down so they can game the ranking system Twitter Grader (which awards a higher score if more people follow you than the other way around) – really, who cares.

The core problem is that social media is being looked at in isolation as something only to be touched by a select group of gurus. Instead, to my mind it should be an intrinsic part of every marcoms campaign – you have an idea of how you are going to target print, broadcast and also online.

It’s a component of the core campaign, and an important one. But it doesn’t sit on its own.

So while I completely get why organisations have individuals like the excellent Shannon Paul (Detroit RedWings), Kelly Feller (Intel) and Scott Monty (Ford) on-board to operate in this space, it seems to make less sense for actual agencies to set up specialist divisions – and every week I still read about someone here in the UK doing just that. For the reasons mentioned above, we took the opposite approach.

We once had a division (Herd was originally the name of it, I simply kept the URL for the blog). But we stopped that last year, thinking that it would be better to skill up all the core account handlers in online media knowledge. And while one or two of the Cows like myself definitely have more of an interest in this area, I’d never bill myself as an ‘expert’!

So the backlash is in full swing, as demonstrated by those two videos below. Maybe no bad thing. Bobbie says at the end of his piece, “I’m sick of “social media sensations”. And I’m sick of social media. Social media is people. People talk about stuff. The end.”

Could Google’s Latitude Be A Twitter Killer?

February 6, 2009

Great article on Mashable yesterday about Google’s new Latitude and the affect it might have on Twitter.

When Google announced Latitude, the company’s new geo-location tool, all the talk was about the technology opening doors for location-based ads in the years ahead. While we probably can be sure that those ads are coming, the big question is whether Latitude might be Google’s secret “Twitter Killer”.

From the article:

I’ve been playing around with Google Latitude on and off since this morning. I must admit, it’s pretty cool and demonstrates why geolocation is interesting, and services like Loopt and BrightKite have found some success as early players in the space.

But as myself and a lot of other commenters have noted, the problem with Latitude is that Google contacts really aren’t your actual social network in most cases, primarily because of the quirky way in which Gmail adds people to your buddy list. Nonetheless, Google Latitude has me thinking about geolocation again, and more aptly, why the big social networking players – Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter – aren’t doing anything with it.

Why It Would Be Great

Facebook, and to a lesser extent Twitter (and formerly MySpace … it still is for lots of other people), is an actual representation of my social network. And, with the ability to sort contacts into different groups (personal friends, colleagues, high school classmates, etc), the privacy concerns that come with any geolocation-based social network are mostly alleviated. Status updates are already built in (Latitude comes with a Status feature too), adding useful data when you see where your friends are. Essentially, it becomes the automated tweet-up.

The only thing seemingly missing from the big social networks is mapping and the decreasingly complex technological barriers it takes to do geolocation. But Google Maps, Yahoo Maps, and Mapquest all have APIs for that.

From eWeek:

“This means software developers will build applications around the triangulation of information; personal behaviors and preferences, your social group of friends and family and your location,” said Jeremiah Owyang, a Forrester Research senior analyst in social computing and the author of the blog Web Strategy. “I’m thinking about [Google’s mobile phone platform] Android and how it connects to it–you can expect Android to come with Latitude as a default software feature in the future.”

Latitude is an application that gives users the ability to track friends, family and colleagues via Google Maps on a PC or mobile device. Already available on BlackBerry, S60 and Windows Mobile devices, and coming soon to the Apple iPhone through Google Mobile App, Owyang said Latitude in its current form is merely a stepping stone, and not yet the be-all-end-all of mobile social networking.

“Google’s a little bit slower to come into this space, but they want to deliver things with quality,” he said, admitting that he couldn’t actually get Latitide to work on his mobile phone. “It might just be a Nokia thing, though,” he suggests. Owyang is referring to companies such as Loopt, which provides a cell phone-based GPS sharing system that allows users to visualize one another using their cell phones and share information. “This technology isn’t anything that new, they just haven’t put it all together yet.”

When that happens—which Owyang predicts is unlikely to occur before the end of the year or perhaps even two years, the future of contextual, location-based marketing and advertising arrives. “Say you and your friends from out of town are in a location in a city and you want to meet up; when this all comes together, it will recommend a restaurant based on what it knows about you and your friends’ preferences,” he said. “Like a good Thai restaurant.”