Posted tagged ‘Blackberry’

BlackBerry Says All Service Restored

October 13, 2011

According to Research in Motion (RIM) executives, all BlackBerry service has been restored following the largest network outage in that smartphone’s history.

The outage started earlier this week in Europe and spread to North America, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America over the course through yesterday.

It appears that a failure at one of the company’s messaging servers in Europe was what set off a domino effect that reportedly caused problems for millions of BlackBerry owners.

From CNN:

“We’ve now restored full services,” RIM’s co-CEO Mike Lazaridis told reporters.

Some BlackBerry users may still see e-mails coming in slowly as the system recovers, he said.

The major outage frustrated customers on nearly every continent who were unable to send and receive e-mails and text messages this week. It also comes at a bad time for RIM, which is facing increased competition from Android and Apple smartphones.

Palm Pre Hits June 6

May 19, 2009

Looks like the Palm Pre will be available June 6 for about $200. This comes with a new two-year contract from Sprint.

Check out the story from Marin Perez at InformationWeek for more information!

From InformationWeek:

Once the undisputed U.S. leader of the smartphone market, Palm has been thoroughly outpaced by the likes of Apple and Research In Motion (NSDQ: RIMM). The Pre, which was introduced at January’s Consumer Electronics Show, was well-received by the press, and Palm is looking to use it as a springboard for a comeback.

With a large capacitive touch screen, Wi-Fi, 3G, GPS, 8 GB of storage, and Bluetooth, the Pre stacks up well against rivals like the iPhone 3G, BlackBerry Storm, and the T-Mobile (Android) G1. One of the most appealing features of the Pre is webOS, the operating system that combines a variety of online services into a finger-friendly user interface.

AT&T To Introduce $20 iPhone Data Plan?

May 18, 2009

It seems that AT&T is considering cutting the price of its monthly service package or offering a range of lower-priced plans. One plan that could be introduced as early as late May would include limited data access at a $10 monthly reduction.

From BusinessWeek:

The possible price cut likely reflects the back-and-forth between AT&T and Apple as they work out whether and under what terms AT&T would remain the sole U.S. iPhone carrier. Apple may want flexibility in pricing as a condition, analysts say. “We understand it’s part of the extension (of its contract) that AT&T wants to maintain,” Richard Doherty, director at consultant Envisioneering Group, says of the prospect of lower data-plan prices. As Apple considers whether to widen its circle of U.S. providers, AT&T may have less ability to balk at Apple’s requests. Representatives of Apple and AT&T declined to comment.

AT&T and Apple also have added scope for price reductions as iPhone manufacturing costs decline. Apple plans to introduce a new version of iPhone software in June, and it may unveil a new, cheaper device in June or July. New devices may cost as much as one-third less to produce than earlier versions, Doherty says. The cost of touchscreens, the most expensive component, has declined by more than 30% in the past year, estimates Michael Cote, an analyst at consultant Cote Collaborative Wireless Strategy.

Lower-priced data plans would probably lure a lot of fence-sitters, including students and consumers with lower incomes. A reduction could boost AT&T’s iPhone subscriber additions by 20% to 25%, estimates wireless industry consultant Chetan Sharma. A survey late last year by comScore indicated that 43% of iPhone buyers earned more than $100,000 a year. But many of the wealthiest subscribers have already signed up. In the first quarter, AT&T activated 1.6 million iPhones, and 40% of those activations were for users new to AT&T. “(A price reduction) absolutely makes sense,” Sharma says. “AT&T is starting to hit a wall in terms of new subscribers.” In the first quarter of 2009, AT&T’s net subscriber additions were 5.6% lower than in the year-earlier period.

The Keys To Excellent Online Writing

January 26, 2009

Writing a great blog post (like all of mine, right?) isn’t rocket science, but it is slightly different from how you write an email to a friend or develop a formal business memo.

In this post, Joel Postman explains that the key is understanding that you’re writing for a different kind of medium. You’ll find that your tone is most likely going to be a lot more informal than other documents you may develop for clients, or your boss. 

From Social Media Today:

If you’re in a field like PR, marketing, advertising, or social media, and you have a blog, you have an obligation to write well. Have you ever seen an e-mail from a Blackberry with the signature “Sent from my Blackberry, please excuse the typos.”? My Blackberry signature was “Sent from my Blackberry, but I hope there aren’t any typos, because I’m a professional communicator!”

As a professional communicator, you have to ask yourself just what is it your clients are paying you for, or more simply, what are they buying from you? They are paying you to communicate. That is the literal definition of a professional communicator. And if the product they see in your blog is shoddy, that reflects on you and your company. Your company’s clients, and prospective clients, are constantly observing, and making judgments about, the company’s ability to communicate professionally.

Other than laziness, there are three culprits in the decline in the quality of online writing: e-mail, chat, and SMS. With the introduction of informal online communications, people who generally had to write to a strict set of guidelines were suddenly free to write anything, any way they wanted. No one but your recipient sees your e-mail or IMs goes the argument, so you can relax, and be yourself when you use these tools.

Go back to the basics: spelling, style government, grammar, punctuation, and usage

The fastest way to vastly improve the writing on your blog is to discard the notion that since blogging is “different,” you don’t have to follow the rules. If you write white papers, press releases, briefings, scripts, etc. for clients, you know the tolerance they have (in most cases zero) for bad writing. A professional blog should be written to the same standards you would apply to a final document you would be willing to send to a client.

Understand that online writing is different

Writing effectively online is very much like writing off-line with a few exceptions. Off-line word counts of 700 to 1500 hundred for short to medium length documents don’t apply online. (The blog post you are reading is a long one, and thanks for sticking with it this far.) A typical blog post should be 250-500 words. Paragraphs should generally not be of more than five sentences each.

Write like “the greats”

You probably know good writing when you see it. Emulate the writing of the people whose work you respect and read most. If you read something and it moves along quickly, maintains your interest, and offers the occasional surprise or unexpected moment of enlightenment, go back and take a minute to figure out what it is about the writing you found so attractive. Now, go write like that.

Palm Debuts Their New Touch Screen Phone

January 8, 2009

Palm has introduced the smartphone it hopes will return the wireless pioneer to its glory days, as it showcased the “Palm Pre,” at CES. The device  is aimed at helping users retrieve and consolidate the usual trove of information that might be scattered across a number of online sites and software programs.

From the Associated Press:

Palm Inc. unveiled a new touch-screen smart phone and operating system Thursday, marking its latest attempt to catch up with competition from Research In Motion Ltd.’s BlackBerry and Apple Inc.’s iPhone.

At the International Consumer Electronics Show, Palm executives touted their Pre, which looks similar to the iPhone, with a face dominated mostly by a 3.1-inch touch screen and single button. The body of the Pre is black and slightly curved, with a full QWERTY keyboard that slides out from the bottom.

In an effort to capture both business and consumer users, the Pre will come loaded with features including Wi-Fi, stereo Bluetooth and GPS, as well as 8 gigabytes of storage space, a 3-megapixel camera and music and video playback. The Pre also has a variety of sensors, such as an accelerometer so images on the screen will rotate when a user turns the device on its side.

Many of these features are already available on rival phones, including the iPhone, the latest BlackBerry models and HTC Corp.’s G1 that was released in the fall by T-Mobile and Google Inc. Palm has been overshadowed in the last several years by the success of these products — especially by the growth of BlackBerry smart phones among business customers and, since its June 2007 release, of iPhones among consumer users.

According to data from comScore Inc., as of October, Palm devices accounted for about 15.6 percent of the U.S. smart phone market. Some of Palm’s smart phones run on its own operating system, while others use Microsoft Corp.’s Windows Mobile operating system.

Palm, a pioneer in the market for handheld digital assistants, now hopes its latest offering can stand out.

“We think it’s the one phone you can use for your entire life and you’ll really enjoy using it,” Palm Chief Executive Ed Colligan said at a news conference.

The Pre will be available in the second half of the year, exclusively on Sprint Nextel Corp.’s wireless network. Palm did not disclose the price.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Palm Inc. introduced a long-awaited new operating system and touch-screen wireless phone on Thursday following a nearly two-year long restructuring effort designed to revamp the company’s product portfolio.

Shares of Palm got a lift following the company’s appearance at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The stock has lost more than half its value over the past four months as sales of the company’s aging line of smart phones have begun to stall.

At the event, Palm executive chairman Jon Rubinstein announced a new device called the Palm Pre — a touch-screen phone that also slides out to reveal a full QWERTY keyboard. It will be the first device to run on the company’s new WebOS platform, an operating system Palm built from scratch for a new family of devices.

“We need the right phone on the right platform to compete in the market,” Mr. Rubinstein told the gathering.

At Palm, Mr. Rubinstein has been leading a wide-scale restructuring effort designed to revive the company’s business. Palm was an early pioneer in the smart-phone category with its Treo device, but the company has since lost market share to rival devices such as the BlackBerry by Research In Motion and Apple’s iPhone.

Wal-Mart Delivers iPhones, But AT&T Offers a Special $99 Option

December 30, 2008

Wal-Mart began selling the iPhone on Sunday at more than 2,500 outlets, charging $197 and $297 for the 8 GB and 16 GB models. Those hoping the retailer would discount the Apple handset heavily will have to turn to AT&T, which is offering a black, refurbished 8 GB iPhone 3G for $99 until Dec. 31.

From InformationWeek:

Wal-Mart on Sunday began start selling Apple’s wildly popular iPhone at nearly 2,500 of its stores, but not at the $99 price that was previously expected.The retailer said it would offer Apple’s black 8-GB iPhone 3G model, which also holds about 2,000 songs, for $197. The 16-GB model, which comes in black or white, will be priced at $297. Apple sells its handsets for $199 and $299 for its 8 GB and 16 GB models, respectively.

Consumers would still need to purchase a two-year service agreement from AT&T (NYSE: T), Apple’s U.S. provider. New plans start at $70 per month.

Earlier this month, The Associated Press and Bloomberg news quoted unnamed Wal-Mart employees who said the popular smartphones were expected at heavily discounted prices before the end of the year. However, there was no confirmation that Wal-Mart would offer a $99, 4-GB iPhone.

Still, Wal-Mart has the potential of providing a major boost to iPhone sales. Apple sold 6.89 million iPhones during its last reported financial quarter, which ended on Sept. 27. Apple’s iPhone market share for the first quarter was 19.2%, a drop from 26.7% the quarter before. Only Research In Motion (NSDQ: RIMM)’s BlackBerrysmartphone market. series controls a larger share of the

Despite Wal-Mart’s reputation for pushing prices lower than its competition, consumer can find Apple’s iPhone smartphone for much less elsewhere.

Best Buy (NYSE: BBY) currently sells the 8-GB iPhone for $190 and the 16-GB version for $290 until Dec. 31. That’s $10 less than the usual price found at Apple stores.

The lowest price award, however, goes to AT&T, which is selling refurbished iPhone 3Gs in the black 8-GB version for $99 with a two-year service contract through the end of the year. Previously, AT&T discounted its refurbished iPhones to $149. The wireless telecom is also offering refurbished 16-GB iPhone handsets for $199 during the same time period.

The Top Media & Marketing Innovations of 2008

December 16, 2008

Adweek has called out Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to open the social network platform to developers who wanted to create applications for users as a top media and marketing innovation of 2008. The magazine notes Facebook’s move had ripple effects, influencing Steve Jobs to open the Apple iPhone to developers and MySpace to open its network to third-party applications.

From AdWeek:

Zuckerberg’s Most Popular

Facebook may not, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg awkwardly proclaimed when announcing its ad strategy over a year ago, have changed the face of media, but it most certainly has changed the development of a medium. Its move in May of last year to open the social-networking service to outside developers proved remarkably farsighted and influential. Its platform spread like a virus in 2008. As MySpace quarreled with widget makers about building business off its audience, Facebook embraced the outside help. The rationale was simple but revolutionary: The surest way to build out services is to have an outside army of developers do it. To date, 400,000 developers have introduced some 52,000 apps-and Facebook, not coincidentally, has exploded, expanding its user base to 130 million worldwide. That not only led MySpace to embrace outside developers but also paved the way for Apple to open the iPhone platform. The result: Everyone has found platform religion. David Verklin, head of the cable TV consortium Project Canoe, even talks of the boob tube as a platform. When the book is written on Facebook — and many are in the works — its critical choice to open up to outsiders may be seen as its most lasting contribution to the development of digital media.

iPhone Juices Mobile Medium
Apple’s iPhone 3G may not singlehandedly push mobile advertising to seriously-big-bucks, steady-line-on-the-flowchart status in 2009 — the sorry economy will most likely keep that from happening. And the trendy device won’t have the U.S. suddenly turning into South Korea, where 90 percent of the population dumps their PCs and starts watching movies and playing games on their mobiles. But in 2008, the iPhone phenomenon did create a shift in the mindset of the American consumer — from “Why would I want to surf the Web on my crappy phone?” to “I can do that? I want one now!” Thus, the touch screen has become the default design choice among models ranging from Google’s G1 and Samsung’s Instinct to the BlackBerry Storm (which, upon its debut last month, managed to create lines outside retail outlets reminiscent of those for the latest iPhone this past July). Then there are the many iPhone games and applications that have launched — everything from a New York Times app to the Social Gaming Network’s iBowl. It’s now clear that the mobile medium is going to get there, and that advertisers are going to have a real canvas to play on in the near future, one that goes beyond short-code messages and clunky WAP sites. For that, they can thank Steve Jobs.

All A-Twitter
It’s easy to make fun of Twitter. The short-messaging service’s simple concept — roadcast what you’re doing right now — has become synonymous with banal updates like your friend is “eating a taco.” To be sure, plenty of taco-eating bulletins are broadcast daily by the six million registered users of the two-and-a-half-year-old service. But the surging popularity of Twitter points to a social-networking truth: Our conceptions of one another — and brands — are often formed by bite-sized interactions. A single update does not in itself mean much — but taken with hundreds, even thousands of them, those little messages can come together to paint a rich portrait. What’s more, Twitter nailed something that’s fundamental to the Web: Keep it simple. Frustrating to some for its lack of bells and whistles, Twitter’s simple “What are you doing?” query and 140-character message limit are arguably its strengths. Twitter also proved that the most successful Web applications are flexible and open. Twitter’s designers never envisioned that consumers would use the service to communicate with one another, but users refashioned it as such, employing the prefix “@+user name” to direct replies. So, Twitter rejiggered to support that back-and-forth, while also letting outside developers build apps, further bolstering Twitter’s popularity. “Tweeting” may not be for everyone, but it’s clearly onto something: The 25-person company recently turned down a $500 million acquisition offer from Facebook.


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