Posted tagged ‘LinkedIn’

Twitter and LinkedIn Join Forces

November 9, 2009

Today, Twitter and LinkedIn joined forces in an agreement that will allow users of both services to sync their status updates.

From TechCrunch:

LinkedIn will now allow you to update your status on your LinkedIn profile and then share the message automatically to Twitter. To enable to enable the cross posting feature, you just need to click the new Twitter box under your Network Updates box on the homepage and sync with your Twitter account (via oAuth).

The integration works the other way as well. You can also share Tweets to your LinkedIn profile from Twitter or any other client by adding the hashtag “#in” or “li”. As part of the setup process on LinkedIn, you can choose to either send all your tweets or select tweets that have the hashtag “in” from Twitter back to LinkedIn as a status update. You can also import your Twitter stream into your profile now, which is also an op-in feature. So your profile will show a “Recent Tweets” section that will include a real-time stream of your Tweets.

FriendFeed: More Twitter or Facebook?

January 27, 2009

With its ability to process information coming from more than 60 social Web applications, FriendFeed seems to be less of a competitor to Twitter and more of a threat to Facebook’s News Feed.

With a 3,170 percent increase in traffic over the past year, FriendFeed could be THE social application to watch in 2009.

From PR 2.0:

Defining FriendFeed is easier said than done. In fact, it’s less of a competitor to Twitter and more of a vertical threat to Facebook’s prized news feed. The News Feed featured in Facebook is considered the central nervous system to the social graph. It powers conversations, connections and collaboration. As Facebook Connect “connects” you and your social graph across the Web, it will increase in value as it aggregates all outside activity into one centralized stream for your friends, and friends of friends, to review, interpret, and respond. Also, don’t rule out an acquisition of Twitter either.

FriendFeed is one of the most prominent examples of a dedicated lifestream (brandstream). It channels your social activity and also that of your social graph into one simplified river of relevance. As new items appear in the stream, it invites bookmarking and threaded conversations that promote dialog. For example, you can import activity from flickr, youtube, twitter, backtype, blogs, Last.fm, Seesmic, Upcoming, LinkedIn, Yelp, Amazon, Picasa, Delicious, StumbleUpon, Digg, Reddit, Disqus, and 12 seconds. The growing list of services currently sits at 60, but technically you can integrate any service that generates an RSS feed. Most important is FriendFeed’s ability to port your Facebook status into your stream. Technically, you can now host, contribute to and participate in a more comprehensive “news feed” with the potential of reaching a far greater, or perhaps focused and dedicated audience of people who either aren’t on Facebook or prefer something different.

Social Networking Still Dominated by the Young

January 15, 2009

According to a study by Pew Internet & American Life Project, more people are embracing social networks like MySpace, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook, but use of these sites are still much bigger among a younger audience.

I think at the age of 30, I’m right in the middle but I love social networking and using all of the sites listed above. See my blogroll if you’d like to add me as a friend to any of these sites :)

From the Associated Press:

Of the roughly three-quarters of U.S. adults who go online, 35 percent use social networking sites such as MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn, Pew found in a survey of 2,250 people late last year. Just 8 percent of adult Web users were on social networking sites four years ago.

Through the most recent survey and other polls last year, Pew determined just how much more likely it was for younger people to be participating in social networks. Some 65 percent of online teenagers 12 to 17 use the sites, and three-quarters of Internet users between 18 and 24 have a profile. In comparison, just 7 percent of Internet users who are 65 and older are on the sites.

Among the more surprising of Pew’s findings released Wednesday: Some 17 percent of adults have multiple profiles on one site and 4 percent have profiles for “different parts of their personality.”

But before you start wondering just how many of your friends have multiple personalities, Pew senior research specialist Amanda Lenhart noted that these accounts often emphasize different parts of someone’s life, such as sports or hobbies. Someone might have a hockey-focused profile and a separate one indulging his interest in gardening.

Men and women used the sites in equal proportions, but there were differences when it came to race. About 31 percent of white Web users said they have a profile on at least one social network site, compared with 43 percent of black and 48 percent of Hispanic adults.

Lenhart said the difference can be attributed to the respondents’ ages, as “younger segments of the population (are) much more diverse.” Similarly, because young people tend to make less money, the survey also found that respondents with lower household incomes were more likely to use social network sites than their richer counterparts.

The median ages of MySpace and Facebook users were 26 and 27 years old, respectively. At the career-focused LinkedIn, it was 40.

Can Social Media Help the Republican Party?

January 7, 2009

Great article on Ars Technica today on this very topic!

After experiencing defeat at the hands of Barack Obama’s networked Democratic Party, a number of young Republican strategists have been arguing the future of the Republican Party will be found using social media.

While author Julian Sanchez believes deeper soul searching might be required to bring the Republican Party back to power, his article provides some interesting background on the discussions surrounding the GOP’s online future.

From Ars Technica:

Since the humbling results of the November election came in, the conservative movement has been scrambling to assess what happened—and to figure out how to prevent it from happening again. Much of this effort, in light of the Obama campaign’s much ballyhooed online operation, has focused on closing the technology gap with the left, and getting conservative candidates and activists to make better use of new media. Hence we see sites like Top Conservatives on Twitter, meant to publicize co-partisans on the popular microblogging service and encourage others to sign up.

The most prominent of the restructuring efforts, though, is Rebuild the Party, brainchild of a group of Republican online strategists who are pushing the idea that adapting to the Internet must be the GOP’s top priority over the next four years. They’re proposing an ambitious goal of recruiting 5 million new online activists and insisting on a new openness that better integrates distributed grassroots efforts. In the past week, RedState founder Erick Erickson has laid out some more detailed advice to his fellow conservatives—heartily seconded by The Next Right’s Patrick Ruffini.

There are plenty of good ideas here, and this is clearly an area where the right needs to make up ground. We now know that strategists on McCain’s team actually proposed taking advantage of text-messaging, but were shot down because the idea seemed “undignified.” We also know, via the folks who model the blogosphere with an array of sophisticated statistical tools, that there was a lot of grassroots writing and activism going on that never got well integrated into the online activist “core.” And as I reported the other day, Barack Obama is looking at a huge advantage in supporters who are connected, and ready to push his agenda, on the Internet.  It’s absolutely true that they’ve got to play serious catch-up on this front.

But while Nancy Scola at TechPresident lauds Ruffini for avoiding “tool fetishism”—for recognizing that adapting to the Net is more about embracing a certain culture and worldview than about exploiting any particular gadget or social networking site—I wonder whether there isn’t a broader technofetishism at work here.  It’s not that they shouldn’t be thinking about how to do online organizing as well as the Obama team did, but at times the impulse to focus on modernizing tactics and strategy makes me think of the Microsoft execs convinced that the right ad campaign will finally convince people they love Vista.

Conservatism has much bigger problems right now than a paucity of Twitter skills. (I say this, for what it’s worth, as someone who’s often classified as part of the broad “right,” my frequent criticisms of this administration notwithstanding.) Front and center is that the end of the Cold War and a governing party that made “small government” a punchline has left it very much unclear what, precisely, “conservatism” means. The movement was always a somewhat uneasy coalition of market enthusiasts and social traditionalists, defined at least as much by what (and who) they opposed as by any core common principles. The Palin strategy—recapturing that oppositional unity by rebranding the GOP as the party of cultural ressentiment—is just a recipe for a death spiral. Conservatives don’t need to figure out how to promote conservatism on Facebook; they need to figure out what it is they’re promoting. To the extent that a new media strategy is part of opening up that conversation, great, but it had better not become a substitute for engaging in some of that painful introspection.

There are plenty of good ideas here, and this is clearly an area where the right needs to make up ground. We now know that strategists on McCain’s team actually proposed taking advantage of text-messaging, but were shot down because the idea seemed “undignified.” We also know, via the folks who model the blogosphere with an array of sophisticated statistical tools, that there was a lot of grassroots writing and activism going on that never got well integrated into the online activist “core.” And as I reported the other day, Barack Obama is looking at a huge advantage in supporters who are connected, and ready to push his agenda, on the Internet.  It’s absolutely true that they’ve got to play serious catch-up on this front.

When Marketing, Don’t Forget About Blogs

December 11, 2008

With all the hype surrounding social networking sites, it’s easy to forget how integral blogging is to a successful social media marketing effort. Reaching out to bloggers can create all four essential components of a great social media marketing push: User-created content, positive third-party feedback, search results and social networking.

From Adotas:

As the number of social networkers and Twitter-ers continues to grow, advertisers and marketers often find themselves employing tactics such as setting up a “Fan-page” on Facebook, posting tweets on Twitter or developing applications to attract consumers to their brand.

But all of these tactics ignore a critical player in the online marketing game—blogs.

The fragmented nature of social networks is also a factor when considering which strategy will be most successful in generating positive ROI. By focusing on one or a handful of social networks, marketers are placing limitations on the reach of their brand and message.

Instead, brands need to revisit the original form of social media – the blogosphere – to reach the masses. Having evolved into a reliable source of information for consumers, blogs play a bigger and more important role for marketers than ever before. Bloggers allow marketers to successfully engage consumers around their brand through countless outlets including the micro-blogs that are essential to giving everyone a “voice.”

There have been a recorded 77.7 Million unique visitors to blogs versus 41 Million visits to Facebook and 77 percent of active Internet users read blogs. These statistics indicate that visits to blogs far outweigh visits to social networking sites.

The fragmented nature of social networks is also a factor when considering which strategy will be most successful in generating positive ROI. By focusing on one or a handful of social networks, marketers are placing limitations on the reach of their brand and message.

Increasingly, consumers are turning to blogs for news, reviews and recommendations. Trust in “a person like me” has tripled, from 20% to 68% from 2004 to 2006. Marketers still wary of letting outside sources control their brands should keep in mind that most word of mouth is positive.

On Twitter, Those Nobodies Can Add Up

December 3, 2008

In this posting, blogger Guy Kawasaki offers his take on using Twitter as a business tool. His critical insight is that the law of large numbers applies to success on Twitter. Don’t focus on attracting a few so-called influential Twitter users as followers, but instead interest as many people as you can muster. Kawasaki writes: “It’s better to have army of committed nobodies and than a few drive-by somebodies.”

Anybody who wants to follow this blog on Twitter is welcome to do so. The name is: KreuzersKorner. (I’m also on MySpace, Facebook and LinkedIn as well.

Most of my blog postings deal with Sports, Politics, Music and Social Media. I don’t break stories or news, I just guide others to stories of interest to me that might be of interest to you as well.

I’ve found myself following the state of the economy, Casey/Caylee Anthony case and politics mostly over the past few months. But, as I have stated before, any topic is fair game.

Anyway, back to Mr. Kawasaki’s post. There is a lot of good information that can be learned by those who plan to use Twitter as a business tool.

From the post:

You must buy into the theory that products and services reach critical mass because mere mortals spread the word for you. This defies the common wisdom that a handful of “influentials” shape what the rest of us try and what we adopt. In the online world, these influentials include Mike “I can go a week without Twitter” Arrington, Robert Scoble, Seth Godin, and to some extent me.

Reliance on influentials is flawed because the Internet has flattened and democratized information. Influentials don’t have as much special access, special knowledge, and distribution as you might think because of the growth of websites, blogs, and, of course, Twitter.

This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t care about influentials—if nothing else they can help you get to what some consider “nobodies.” But mark my words: (a) Nobodies are the new somebodies, and (b) it’s better to have army of committed nobodies and than a few drive-by somebodies. The most somebodies can usually do for you is a one day bump in traffic.

One more point: if enough nobodies like what you do, the somebodies will have no choice but to write about you. In this way, the buzz of nobodies begets the attention of somebodies and not vice versa.

Study: Kids Are Actually Learning By Social Networking

November 20, 2008

A study by the MacArthur Foundation suggests teenagers who interact on social networks are building important real-world skill sets — even though they might look to their parents like they are frittering away their lives. “Their participation is giving them the technological skills and literacy they need to succeed in the contemporary world,” said Mizuko Ito, the lead researcher on the study. “They’re learning how to get along with others, how to manage a public identity, how to create a home page.”

From the New York Times:

Good news for worried parents: All those hours their teenagers spend socializing on the Internet are not a bad thing, according to a new study by the MacArthur Foundation.

The study, conducted from 2005 to last summer, describes new-media usage but does not measure its effects.

“It certainly rings true that new media are inextricably woven into young people’s lives,” said Vicki Rideout, vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation and director of its program for the study of media and health. “Ethnographic studies like this are good at describing how young people fit social media into their lives. What they can’t do is document effects. This highlights the need for larger, nationally representative studies.”

Ms. Ito, a research scientist in the department of informatics at the University of California, Irvine, said that some parental concern about the dangers of Internet socializing might result from a misperception.

“Those concerns about predators and stranger danger have been overblown,” she said. “There’s been some confusion about what kids are actually doing online. Mostly, they’re socializing with their friends, people they’ve met at school or camp or sports.”

The study, part of a $50 million project on digital and media learning, used several teams of researchers to interview more than 800 young people and their parents and to observe teenagers online for more than 5,000 hours. Because of the adult sense that socializing on the Internet is a waste of time, the study said, teenagers reported many rules and restrictions on their electronic hanging out, but most found ways to work around such barriers that let them stay in touch with their friends steadily throughout the day.

“Teens usually have a ‘full-time intimate community’ with whom they communicate in an always-on mode via mobile phones and instant messaging,” the study said.


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